NYUCI In The News, 2010

December, 2010

 

Staten Island Advance

December 22
Young Cancer Survivor Gives Gift of Hope
The Andrew J. Gargiso Foundation visited NYU Langone Medical Center on Saturday. Year after year, the family raises money in support of pediatric cancer research, having provided grants to NYU Langone Medical Center and the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Center for Children with Cancer.
More: silive.com

 

The Scientist

December 22
Top 7 Studies in Developmental Biology - By Bob Grant
A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in developmental biology from the magazine for Faculty of 1000, a collaboration of 1000 international Faculty Members that identifies and evaluate the most important articles in biology and medical research publications, highlights a study co-authored by researchers from NYU School of Medicine that discusses reprogramming adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells using synthetic mRNA molecules.
More: the-scientist.com

 

The New York Times

December 21
(Coverage also appeared in USA Today, Cincinnati News, Examiner.com, CBSNews.com and TusconCitizen.com)
Weighing the Risk of a Chemical in Tap Water - By John Collins Rudolf
Low levels of hexavalent chromium have been found in drinking water supplies across the United States. Max Costa, PhD, chairman of the department of environmental medicine says the levels of the chemical were "disturbing".
More: green.blogs.nytimes.com, usatoday.com, cincinnati.com, examiner.com, cbsnews.com, tucsoncitizen.com

 

Washington Post

(Also appeared in the ChicagoTribune.com and OregonLive.com)
December 19
Probable Carcinogen Hexavalent Chromium Found in Drinking Water of 31 U.S. Cities - By Lyndsey Layton
An environmental group analyzed the drinking water in 35 cities across the United States finding that most contained hexavalent chromium, a probable carcinogen that was made famous by the film "Erin Brockovich." Max Costa, PhD, an expert in hexavalent chromium, called the new findings "disturbing." "
More: washingtonpost.com, oregonlive.com, chicagotribune.com

 

Science Magazine

December 17 2010
Genetic Analysis Points the Way to Individualized PSA Tests - By Jennifer Couzin-Frankel
PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, which cells in the prostate gland churn out at higher levels when cancer is present. "Basically what we're talking about is changing the parameters of detection of disease," says Richard Hayes, an epidemiologist at NYU School of Medicine who has studied some of these gene variants. In theory, the approach could be applied to biomarkers for other cancers, too, making them more precise and more clinically useful.
More: sciencemag.org

 

Pittsburgh Post Gazette

December 17
Dangers From Coal, Cars - By David Templeton
More study is imperative to unravel which components in particles represent the "smoking gun" affecting health -- be it heavy metals, sulfates, nitrates or organic compounds including carbon or ammonia sulfate.
More: post-gazette.com

 

Dr. Oz Show

December 16
The Doctor Oz Show: Cancer Edition
Deborah Axelrod, MD, of the NYU Cancer Institute was highlighted on the Dr. Oz Show as a leading breast cancer surgeon. She also answered questions on-air from Dr. Oz and members of the audience about breast cancer.
More: Video Preview

 

Black News Tribune

(Also picked up by PlatformA, BV Newswire)
December 13
Aretha Franklin's Family Remaining Positive Despite Cancer Battle - By Bridget Bland
Over the past week, news of Aretha Franklin‘s purported pancreatic cancer diagnosis has given her fans little hope that the Grammy Award-winning R&B singer will return to her reign as Queen of Soul.
More: blacknewstribune.com, platform-a.com, bvnewswire.com

 

Associated Content

(Also picked up on Fertility-Pregnancy blog)
December 13
Older Moms, Fertility Drugs & the Risk of Breast Cancer: The Legacy of Elizabeth Edwards & the New Green Fertility Movement - By Colette Bouchez, Yahoo! Contributor Network
There are some factors that increase the risk of breast cancer, among them is bearing children later in life, with some research suggesting the use of fertility drugs might play a role.
Read: associatedcontent.com, fertility-pregnancy.blogspot.com

 

Red Dress Diary Blog

December 13, 2010
Older Moms, Fertility Drugs & Breast Cancer- By Colette Bouchez
No one knows why a woman gets breast cancer; but research shows late motherhood and the use of fertility drugs could increase the risk.
More: reddressdiary.blogspot.com

 

MedScape

(Also picked up by DocGuide News)
December 12
Vitamin D Deficiency is Common Among Breast Cancer Survivors - By Jill Stein
More than a third of postmenopausal breast cancer survivors have vitamin D deficiency, researchers announced here at the 33rd annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).
More: docguide.com, medscape.com

 

MSNBC

(Also appeared in Women's Health)
December 10
Screening Confusion: What's Best For Your Breasts?
To test or not to test? Or more specifically, when to test? Last November, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that women swap their after-40 annual mammograms for biannual ones starting at 50, and quit breast self-exams altogether.
More: msnbc.msn.com, womenshealthmag.com

 

CBS News.com

December 9
Aretha Franklin Has Pancreatic Cancer, Reports Say: What Are Her Odds? - By David W Freeman
"Overall, the five-year survival rate for pancreatic cancer patients is 35 percent. An individual is not a statistic," said Dr. H. Leon Pachter, chairman of surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center, adding that some of the patients he has treated for the disease have survived for more than a decade. As with other types of cancer, pancreatic cancer is treated with chemotherapy, and radiation. But the only way to cure the disease is via surgery, Dr. Pachter says.
More: cbsnews.com

 

Detroit News

(Also appeared in Seattle Times, TwinCities.com, Telam and ABCPhotos.com)
December 9
Aretha Franklin Pancreatic Cancer
Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest a person can have, though about 15 percent to 18 percent of those with the disease can survive with surgery, Dr. Elliot Newman, chief of gastrointestinal surgical oncology at NYU Langone Medical Center, told the Detroit News
More: detnews.com, seattletimes.nwsource.com, twincities.com, telam.com, abcphotonews.com

 

CNN

December 8
NYU Director: Early Detection Still 'Greatest Weapon' Against Breast Cancer
Director of breast surgery at NYU Langone Center Dr. Freya Schnabel gives CNN's American Morning's Kiran Chetry tips for early detection of breast cancer, in the wake of Elizabeth Edward's passing.
More: cnn.com

 

Jacob W Magazine

December 8
Breast Cancer Awareness Month: 26 Years On, Where Do We Stand?
Breast cancer continues to take a heavy toll on American women, 26 years after health advocates named October National Breast Awareness Month.
More: jacobw.com

 

New York Times

(Also appeared in ABC News, NY1, Business Week, CBS News, The Med Guru, and ABC World News Tonight)
December 7
Aspirin Helps in Reducing Cancer Deaths, a Study Finds - By Roni Caryn Rabin
Many Americans take aspirin to lower their risk of heart disease, but a new study suggests a remarkable added benefit, reporting that patients who took aspirin regularly for a period of several years were 21 percent less likely decades later to die of solid tumor cancers, including cancers of the stomach, esophagus and lung.
More: nytimes.com, abcnews.go.com, ny1.com, businessweek.com, cbsnews.com, themedguru.com, abcnews.go.com

 

Prostate Cancer Victory

December 7
New Prostate Cancer Treatment
Doctors at NYU Langone Medical Center are experimenting with light as they look toward a new, noninvasive way to treat and prevent prostate cancer.
More: prostatecancervictory.com

 

NY1

December 6
Doctors Shed Light On New Prostate Cancer Treatment - By Kafi Drexel
Doctors at NYU Langone Medical Center are experimenting with light as they look toward a new, noninvasive way to treat and prevent prostate cancer.
More: ny1.com

 

NBC – Today Show

(Also: Also NBC Daily Connection, Providence Imaging)
December 1
Women and Mammograms
Dr. Freya Schnabel of NYU Langone Medical Center appeared on the Today Show on NBC to discuss a new study from the UK that suggests yearly mammograms reduce the risk of mastectomies.
More: provimaging.com

 

E! Online

December 2010
Marisa Miller Poses for the Protect the Skin You're In! - By Ella Ngo
Model Marisa Miller was photographed for the in Marc Jacob's skin cancer awareness campaign, Protect the Skin You're In. The image of the 32-year-old Victoria's Secret strutter will appear on T-shirts and will be available at Marc Jacobs boutiques, with all proceeds benefitting the NYU Cancer Institute.
More: eonline.com

 


 

November, 2010

 

WCBS-TV Channel 2

November 24
Yoga and Pet Therapy at Hassenfeld Center - By Holly Phillips, MD
Linda Granowetter, MD, Medical Director of the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at NYU Medical Center, was interviewed along with Michelle Karogaard, researcher and pet therapist and a patient for a segment on how pet and yoga therapy can lead to patient healing.
More: wcax.com

 

New York Post

November 17
Health: Breath of Fresh Air - By Rachel Grumman Bender
Study sponsored by the National Cancer institute (NCI) - one of the largest in the last decade - showed that screening smokers and ex smoker with CT scans significantly reduced death from lung cancer compared to chest x-rays. "Unlike a lot of other cancers where there have been substantial improvements over the last several decades and new treatments, lung cancer has remained resistant to most attempts to cure it, unless you catch if very early," said David Naidich, MD, professor, Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center. Harvey Pass, MD, professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery added, "The trend is to be able to figure out which markers can tell you what chemotherapy to use or what targeted therapy to use.
Print only (p 52), no link available.

 

New York Times

November 16
M.R.I.'s Help Fight High Risk of Cancer - By Denise Grady
A new study suggests the use of annual MRIs in addition to mammograms and breast exams for women with a high risk of breast cancer because of genetic mutations or family history may save lives. Linda Moy, MD, assistant professor, Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, spoke to the finding that MRIs identified cancers in those with gene mutations at much higher rates than mammograms. "The difference is stark, bigger than what I would have expected," she said, "The new findings emphasize the need to monitor mutation carriers closely with M.R.I."
More: nytimes.com

 

Medscape Medical News

November 12
PSA Screening Has Similar Sensitivity to First Prostate Cancer Biopsy - By Barbara Boughton
A retrospective analysis of 1665 patients who underwent prostate biopsies at a New York medical center has found that a first prostate biopsy has a sensitivity of about 80% - a rate comparable to that of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, according to research presented here at the American Society for Clinical Pathology 2010 Annual Meeting. "Many clinicians are still doing a 12-core biopsy, but this study clearly suggests that there might be clinical utility in a core biopsy of more than 12 cores," said Peng Lee, MD, PhD, associate professor of pathology and urology at the NYU School of Medicine.
More: medscape.com

 

Women's Health Magazine

November 12
Mammograms: What's Best For Your Breasts? - By Alyssa Giacobbe
Article explores conflict created by recommendations last November from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) that women swap their after-40 annual mammograms for biannual ones starting at 50, and quit breast self-exams altogether, citing evidence that less frequent mammograms could be equally effective at catching cancer. Current research hasn't yielded any hard conclusions, leaving patients confused and aggravated. "One disturbing aspect of the guidelines is that they're based on the idea that having a mammogram is anxiety provoking," says Karen L. Hiotis, MD, assistant professor, Department of Surgery and NYU Cancer Institute. "That's almost an insult to me as a woman."
More: womenshealthmag.com

 

Panache Privee

November 8
2010 Adults in Toyland Casino Night
"Adults in Toyland Casino Night-Gaming for a Cause" co-chairs Susan Block Casdin, Keri Glassman, Kimberly Goodwin, Morgan Hertzan, Steven Jaffe, Patti Kim, Joshua Laterman, Kelly Kennedy Mack, Harlan Saroken, and Michael Weaver hosted a festive night in a casino setting with a silent auction to benefit the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the NYU Cancer Institute and the Department of Pediatrics at NYU Langone Medical Center on Thursday, November 4, 2010, at The Edison Ballroom in Manhattan. .
More: panacheprivee.com

 

CBS Newspath

Shown on 60 affiliated CBS Stations across the country
November 7, 8
Yoga and Pet Therapy at Hassenfeld Center by Randall Pinkston
Linda Granowetter, MD, director of the Hassenfeld Center was interviewed along with Michelle Krogsgaard, researcher and pet therapist and a patient . Miranda, the pet therapy dog visits once a week. Yoga is also offered to the children. Says Dr. Granowetter "I think there's medical and surgical healing and then there's healing from feeling safe and cared for."
More: Watch video

 

Wall Street Journal

November 6
Heard & Scene
Over 600 guests ventured to the Edison Ballroom for the Adults in Toyland Casino Night benefiting the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at the NYU Langone Medical Center. They looked surprisingly clean cut, despite an event title that has a somewhat erotic resonance. Catherine Manno, a pediatrics specialist, laughed at the idea that the black jack and poker night could be mistaken for something else. "Do you think more people would come if they thought that?" asked Dr. Manno.
More: wsj.com

 

LXTV

November 5
Adults in Toyland
Sara Gore of LX TV highlighted the Adults in Toyland event, explaining that it was held to raise money for kids with cancer and other blood diseases for the Hassenfeld Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. Over $600,000 was raised before the evening even started.
More: 360mediawatch.com

 

HAUTE LIVING MAGAZINE

November 5
Dori's World: Adults in Toyland Casino Night By Dori Cooperman
Last night was the annual Adults in Toy Land Casino Night at the Edison Ballroom in New York City. The event was presented by Caesars Atlantic City and benefits the Steven D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at NYU's Cancer Institute and the Department of Pediatrics at NYU Langone Medical Center. At the event was Jon and Lizzie Tisch, Abigail Klem, Kelly and Steven Mack, Eddie and Brooke Gershel, Brett Heyman, Melissa and Keith Meister, Charlotte and David Blechman, Jennifer Raines, Liz Cohen, Ellie Block, Sylvia Hassenfeld, Chris Mack, Erica Karsch and Richard Mack.
Co-chairs Susan Block Casdin, Kelly Mack, Patti Kim and Keri Glassman worked very hard running the benefit and have been working with the center for many years. Of course, this year's event was again a success!
More: hauteliving.com

 

PatrickMcMullan.com

November 4
Adults In Toyland: Casino Night for a Cause, Hosted by Caesars, Atlantic City
The Edison Ballroom, NYC Photos By Patrick McMullan
More: patrickmcmullan.com

 

CBS News with Katie Couric

November 4
Lung Cancer Screening Breakthrough - By Dr. Jon LaPook
No cancer kills more Americans than lung cancer. Estimates are more than 220,000 will be diagnosed this year and 157,000 will die. On Thursday, for the first time, a major government study showed a high-tech way of screening for lung cancer can drastically reduce the death toll. The study looked at more than 53,000 men and women who smoked the equivalent of a pack a day for about 30 years. These older smokers, ages 55 to 74, were screened with either chest X-ray or a more sensitive CT scan that gives a three-dimensional view. After five years, those who got the scans had 20 percent fewer deaths from lung cancer. "The 20 percent reduced mortality indicates that this approach is able to save lives," said Dr. Douglas Lowy of the National Cancer Institute. "This is one of the most important cancer findings in the last 10 years," said Harvey Pass, MD, of the department of cardiothoracic surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center. "It proves that you can save patients' lives by detecting cancer early."
More: cbsnews.com

 

Manhattan Society

November 4
Adults in Toyland: Casino Night Hosted by Caesars, Atlantic City to Benefit the Hassenfeld Children's Center at NYU Langone Medical Center
The 2010 Adults in Toyland Casino Night Hosted by Caesars, Atlantic City on Thursday, November 4, 2010 at The Edison Ballroom (47th between Broadway and 8th Avenue), New York City, NY. Event Co-Chairs: Susan Block Casdin, Keri Glassman, Kimberly Goodwin, Morgan Hertzan, Steven Jaffe, Patti Kim, Joshua Laterman, Kelly Kennedy Mack, Harlan Saroken, and Michael Weaver. The event proceeds will benefit the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders and the Department of Pediatrics at NYU Langone Medical Center
More: smugmug.com

 


 

October, 2010

 

The Forward

October 27
Forward 50
Harry Ostrer, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center was selected for the annual list by the Forward of the 50 men and women who have made a significant impact on the Jewish story in the past year. A professor of human genetics and division director of the Human Genetics Program at NYU School of Medicine, Dr. Ostrer is a leader among scientists working to understand Jewish genetics.
- Harry Ostrer, MD, professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pathology, Department of Medicine, Division of Human Genetics
More: forward.com

 

News 9 Albany

October 27
Healthy Living: Mammogram Debate - By Kafi Drexel
Anne Valente was in her late 30s when she learned she had breast cancer. That was almost 14 years ago, and she credits getting a mammogram with saving her life. Deborah Axelrod, MD, director of clinical breast services at NYU Langone Medical Center recommends women get screened every year starting at the age of 40, and earlier if there's a family history. "I have a lot of concerns about not doing mammograms and sending the wrong message to people because we don't want to go back to the 1970s when the survival rate was lower than it is now," said Dr. Deborah Axelrod, surgeon.
- Deborah Axelrod, associate professor, Department of Surgery
More: capitalregion.ynn.com, rochester.ynn.com, centralny.ynn.com, utica-mohawkvalley.ynn.com, watertown.ynn.com

 

ProstateCancer.About.com

October 25
NYU Opens Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center
NYU Langone Medical Center recently dedicated a new comprehensive prostate cancer center in Manhattan. The Smilow Center is named after Joel E. Smilow who supplied a $5 million gift to the new center. State-of-the-art prostate cancer care and education were stated as two of the primary goals of the Smilow Center.
- Herbert Lepor, MD, Martin Spatz Chair and professor, Department of Urology, professor, Department of Pharmacology
-Joel E. Smilow, MD, member, Board of Trustees, NYU Langone Medical Center

More: prostatecancer.about.com

 

Crain's New York Business

October 24
Mastectomies Check Out of the Hospital - By Gale Scott
Some plastic surgery offices in New York City have added a new specialty: breast cancer surgeries. These include mastectomies and lumpectomies, followed immediately by reconstruction, all without the overnight stay that is the norm in hospitals. The phenomenon is part of a growing trend toward surgeons using their office-based operating rooms for procedures that were once handled only in hospitals-for example, gynecologists doing tubal ligations. But some surgeons say this is going too far. "I'm shocked to hear this is happening," says Kathie-Ann Joseph, a breast surgeon at NYU Langone Medical Center. "I can't imagine anyone thinking this is a good idea."
- Kathie-Ann Joseph, MD, MPH, assistant professor, Department of Surgery
More: crainsnewyork.com

 

NBC's Grio.com

October 22
Black Women Battle Triple Negative Breast Cancer At Alarming Rates - By Todd Johnson
Triple negative is a type of breast cancer that affects tens of thousands of women each year, especially young women. Kathie-Ann Joseph, MD, assistant professor of surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center says women with triple negative breast cancer lack three hormone receptors known to fuel breast cancer tumors--which means many of the most common drugs and therapies won't work. "About 30 percent of the cases, of breast cancer in African-Americans in this country, 20 to 30 percent are triple negatives versus about 10 to 15 percent in white women," Dr. Joseph said. "So it's not exclusive to African-Americans, but it is certainly higher."
- Kathie-Ann Joseph, MD, MPH, assistant professor, Department of Surgery
More: thegrio.com

 

MedPage Today

October 22
IDSA: Cancer Gene Plays Key Role in HIV Infection - By Michael Smith
Clinicians should note that this in vitro study suggested that tumor suppressor p21 expression in CD4 cells could mediate "elite controllers," but that much more research needs to be done before the finding could be applied clinically. The finding is "one of the hottest new topics in HIV basic science," according to Joel Ernst, MD, of NYU School of Medicine, who was chair of the conference program committee.
- Joel Ernst, MD, Jeffrey Bergstein Professor of Medicine, Departments of Medicine, Microbiology and Pathology
More: medpagetoday.com

 

Washington Square News

(Story also picked up on Regator.com)
October 21
Langone opens prostate cancer research center - By Alessandria Masi. Additional reporting by Lizzy Ott.
NYU Langone Medical Center opened a new medical care and research facility yesterday, raising the bar for care around the country. Joel E. Smilow, a member of the Board of Trustees of NYU Langone and NYU, donated $5 million to build The Smilow Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center. "Different patients have different fears and different needs, and we can meet them," said Herbert Lepor, MD, professor and Martin Spatz Chairman, Department of Urology and director of the new Smilow Prostate Cancer Center at NYU Langone Medical Center.
More: nyunews.com, regator.com

 

The Medical News

(Also Organized Wisdom, DemandCuresToday.com, Topix.com, IndiaTimes)
October 20, 21
NYU Langone Medical Center Announces Establishment of Smilow Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center
NYU Langone Medical Center has established The Smilow Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center with a $5 million gift from Joel E. Smilow, a member of the Board of Trustees at NYU Langone Medical Center and New York University. "Our Center's unique multi-disciplinary, collaborative and evidence-based approach will empower patients with information they need to make the best treatment decisions, thereby helping to ensure satisfaction with treatment outcomes," said Herbert Lepor, MD, the director of the Smilow Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center.
More: news-medical.net, organizedwisdom.com, gatewayforcancerresearch.org, topix.com, indiatimes.com

 

Avon Walk for Breast Cancer

October 21
Eighth Annual Avon Walk for Breast Cancer New York Raises More Than $9.4 Million
More than 3,900 Men and Women Participate in the 39.3-mile Walk; 16 Local Breast Cancer Organizations Receive Grants

The eighth annual Avon Walk for Breast Cancer season continued with the Avon Walk New York this weekend, which raised more than $9.4 million to advance access to care and finding a cure for breast cancer.
More: avonwalk.org

 

Crain's Health Pulse

October 20
NYU Prostate Cancer Center Opens
NYU Langone Medical Center opened the Smilow Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center with a $5 million gift from trustee Joel Smilow. The center's goal is to provide comprehensive care for men with prostate cancer. It also aims to educate patients about the disease and treatment options: In the waiting room, patients are given iPads to access an educational website and interactive video library, while TVs feature videos about prostate cancer and treatment. The center's director is Dr. Herbert Lepor, chairman and professor of urology.
(Subscription only.)

 

CNN American Morning

October 20
Dangers of Hormone Replacement Therapy
Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery and director of breast surgery, comments on studies finding hormone replacement therapies may increase chance of breast cancer and the risk of dying. "This changes the dialogue about hormone replacement therapy because it increases the sense of risk associated with the treatment."
View Clip Here

 

CBS Evening News

(Also ran on CBS2 11:00 News, WIBW-CBS (Topeka), WUSA-CBS (Washington DC))October 19
Dangers of Hormone Replacement Therapies - With Holly Philips
Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery and director of breast surgery comments on studies finding that hormone replacement therapies may increase chance of breast cancer and the risk of dying. "It's an important study as it provides tremendous clarity about the risk of hormone therapy.
View Clip Here

 

WEMT-Fox (Tri-Cities, VA)

(Also ran on WFXL-Fox (Albany GA), KEVN-Fox (Rapid City, SD), KVCT-Fox (Victoria, TX))
October 19
Clarifying Mammogram Recommendations - with Larena Lettow
Continued pick up of National Cancer Institute recommendations for mammograms. Jiyon Lee, MD, assistant professor, Department of Radiology at NYU Langone Medical Center, discusses the issue: "Younger women tend to have breast tissue that is more dense, making it harder to detect a cancer."
View Clip Here

 

HealthDay News

(Also ran on Drugs.com)
October 19
Study Shows HRT Even Riskier Than Thought - By Amanda Gardner, HealthDay Reporter
New research finds prolonged use of hormone replacement therapy raises the risk of breast cancer, and also ups the risk for more severe forms of the disease and increases a woman's chances of dying. Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery and director of breast surgery, comments: "This study goes even further to discourage the use of HRT in any manner that's not respectful of the downside. The WHI had returned hormone therapy to the realm of medicine, not jelly beans. It's medication that has to be viewed in the exact same context of risks and benefits, indications and contraindications. There is a real downside to taking HRT, and getting breast cancer is not a trivial matter at all."
More: consumer.healthday.com, drugs.com

 

Lansing State Journal

October 17
8 Steps to Lower your Breast Cancer Risk - By Bari Nan Cohen, Gannett
People often wonder what they can do to prevent breast cancer. Doctors don't have a miracle list but do know how you can lower your risk. Much of it is living life to the healthiest: Don't beat yourself up for what you can't change. "There are many lifestyle factors that just don't work for the way we live today," says Freya Schnabel, MD, director of breast surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center. "Despite the fact that studies show that bearing children before 30 cuts risk, we can't turn back the clock and change the way people's reproductive habits have evolved."
More: lansingstatejournal.com

 

NY1

October 17
Routine Mammograms Still Your Best Defense, Experts Say
A recent study out of Norway had similar findings, but a larger Swedish study did show a benefit for women in their 40s. Deborah Axelrod, MD, director of clinical breast services at NYU Langone Medical Center, recommends women get screened every year starting at the age of 40, and earlier if there's a family history. "I have a lot of concerns about not doing mammograms and sending the wrong message to people because we don't want to go back to the 1970s when the survival rate was lower than it is now, says Axelrod. "We don't want to treat women who have more advanced breast cancer because it is far better to diagnose them when they have early cancer and when it can successfully be treated."
Axelrod
More: ny1.com

 

Psychology of Medicine (blog)

October 15
Science Times: Decoding Your Health
Blog describes a recent NY Times Science story about the explosion of information about health and medicine. Anna Pavlick, DO, associate professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology and director of the melanoma program at the NYU Cancer Institute offers direction for those who diagnosed with cancer looking for information. "It's probably the most important thing in your cancer care that you believe someone has your best interests at heart," said Dr. Pavlick, "In an area where there are no right answers, you're going to get a different opinion with every doctor you see. You've got to find a doctor you feel most comfortable with, the one you most trust."
More: psychologyofmedicine.blogspot.com

 

Fox Good Day New York

October 15
Controversial Mammogram Guidelines - with Dr. Sapna Parikh
Jiyon Lee, MD, radiologist at NYU Cancer Institute discusses recent federal guidelines and recommendations from American Cancer Institute. "The benefits to mammograms are significant," says Dr. Lee.

 

HealthDay

October 15
Latest Findings Back Mammograms for Women in Their 40s - By Amanda Gardner
Women in their 40s who are thoroughly confused by recent moves to push back the recommended age for having mammograms to 50 may find clarity in a new study that found having the screening scans in the 40s can save lives. But that research followed on the heels of a Norwegian study questioning how much routine mammograms had really contributed to the decline in breast cancer death rates seen recently."It's very confusing. There are no guidelines right now that women can get up in the morning and say with fortitude this is exactly what I'm going to do," said Deborah Axelrod, MD, director of Clinical Breast Programs and Services at NYU Cancer Institute in New York City, who admits to not always knowing what to tell women herself. "It's like dancing on the head of a pin," she said.
More: businessweek.com

 

US News and World Report

(Also HealthDayNews, UAMSHealth, CIS Benefits.com)
October 15
Latest Findings Back Mammograms for Women in Their 40s - Experts Say Earlier Screening Still a Good Idea Despite Debate about Doing them Later - By Amanda Gardner, HealthDay Reporter
Women in their 40s who are thoroughly confused by recent moves to push back the recommended age for having mammograms to 50 may find clarity in a new study that found having the screening scans in the 40s can save lives. "It's very confusing. There are no guidelines right now that women can get up in the morning and say with fortitude this is exactly what I'm going to do," said Deborah Axelrod, MD, director of Clinical Breast Programs and Services at NYU Cancer Institute in New York City, who admits to not always knowing what to tell women herself. "It's like dancing on the head of a pin," she said.
More: health.usnews.com, staywellsolutionsonline.com, uamshealth.com

 

The New York Post

October 13
A Margin of Success: Making Sure Breast Cancer is completely Removed its Key to Recovery- By Rachel Grumman Bender
A new device called the MarginProbe may help sure a patient is cancer-free after surgery by identifying any remaining cancerous cells during surgery.
The non-invasive, radiation-free device, which is in clinical trials at NYU Langone Medical Center and other centers around the country, was tested during dozens of lumpectomy procedures in patients with non-palpable cancers, meaning there wasn't a lump you could feel. "Another surgery is difficult for the patient, and delays them from starting other treatments," says Freya Schnabel, MD, director of breast surgery and professor of Surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center who is investigating the device in hopes of FSA approval. "If there are any questions that something looks unusual or abnormal, the right thing is to take out more tissue," adds Schnabel. But you may be taking more tissue than you need. This is an important thing to get right."

 

Becker's Hospital Review

October 13
NYU Langone, 4 Other New York Hospitals Back $235M Proton Center written by Molly Gamble
NYU Langone Medical Center is one of five New York hospitals backing the $235 million New York Proton Center, according to a Washington Square News report. Construction on the center, which will offer a new form of radiation therapy using proton beams, will begin in February. It is expected to open in 2014 for clinical treatments for a limited number of patients. Other hospitals backing the development include Beth Israel Medical Center, Montefiore Medical Center, Mount Sinai Hospital and Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Read the Washington Square News report on the New York Proton Center.
More: beckershospitalreview.com

 

ABC.com

October 11
Tumor Devours Utah Man's Face, But Not Spirit - By Susan Donaldson James
Maurice Simpson was only 6 weeks old, his mother noticed his eye was slightly puffy. By the time he was 5, fleshly lumps grew so large that they obscured his eye. Over the years, the tumors -- elongated tubular lesions that hang from his eye socket and nose -- grew so large that they engulfed the right side of her son's face. Maurice was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis, a genetic condition that has devoured his face, but hasn't stopped him from living life to the fullest. Now 34, he is the subject of a documentary, "A Brand New Face," by Darlow Smithson Production Company, which aired Sunday night on TLC. Simpson agreed to participate in the documentary to help others. Simpson has the most common form of NF type 1, also known as von Recklingshaus disease, which affects about 1 in 3,300 children, according to Dr. John G. Golfinos, associate professor of neurosurgery and otolaryngology and chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at NYU Langone Medical Center. "The disease shows up on the skin and causes tumor formation in the nerves," he said. "They are part and parcel of the nerve and end up taking them out when they get really big or really painful. They get hundreds and it's impossible to take them all out. Every one you take sacrifices a nerve."
More: abcnews.go.com

 

The New York Social Diary

October 11
NYU Cancer Institute Gala
NYU Cancer Center Institute, an NCI-designated cancer center, raised nearly $1.4 million in unrestricted funds at its annual gala. They honored Silvia Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair of Radiation Oncology at NYU Langone, for her extraordinary contributions to cancer research and care.
More: newyorksocialdiary.com

 

CBS Newspath/CBS 2 News

(Also appeared on CBS4, Big Country KRBC-TV [NBC 9] / KTAB-TV [CBS 10] ABILENE-SWEETWATER, TX, WINS-AM [1010 AM])
October 11
Home Genetic Tests Find Deadly Disease, Sparks Debate
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A new way of predicting the cancer is causing controversy, but some patients say it is saving lives. A 31-year-old mother had a mastectomy because she has a breast cancer gene mutation, BRCA-1. It gives her an 80-percent risk of getting the disease. Jill found out about her genetic risk through a DNA test she learned about on Twitter. After the learning the news, the Steinberg's got genetic counseling, double checked the accuracy, and developed a plan with doctors. But not everyone can afford to do that. "If they get this information without knowing what their choices are, it can be a really devastating blow," says Freya Schnabel, MD, with NYU Langone Medical Center.
More: newyork.cbslocal.com

 

ABC Good Morning America Health

October 8
All About Breast Cancer - Where Do Things Stand?
Deborah Axelrod, MD, discussed the current fight against breast cancer and the increase in survival and said that "One in five women with metastatic breast cancer will be alive ten years later." "Breast cancer is becoming a chronic disease."
More: abcnews.go.com

 

Panache Privee

October 6
NYU Cancer Institute 2010 Gala
NYU Cancer Center Institute, an NCI-designated cancer center, raised nearly $1.4 million in unrestricted funds at its annual gala held on October 5, 2010. The event took place at the Pierre Hotel in Manhattan and honored Silvia Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair of Radiation Oncology at NYU Langone, for her extraordinary contributions to cancer research and care. In addressing the crowd of over 450 guests, Robert I. Grossman, MD, dean and CEO of the Medical Center said, "The NYU Cancer Institute is gathering fantastic momentum-in research breakthroughs, in the depth and scope of clinical expertise, in the extended availability of treatment hours and in community presence." Lori Fink, Chair of the NYU Cancer Institute Advisory Board, and trustee of NYU Langone Medical Center since 2003, said, "We are thrilled to celebrate our immensely gifted honoree, Silvia Formenti, whose innovations in science and clinical care are nothing short of groundbreaking.
More: panacheprivee.com

 

Manhattan Society

October 5
2010 NYU CANCER INSTITUTE GALA RAISES NEARLY $1.4 MILLION
NYU Cancer Institute Gala on Tuesday, October 5, 2010 at The Pierre Hotel, 2 East 61st Street, Manhattan. The event took place at the Pierre Hotel in Manhattan and honored Silvia Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair of Radiation Oncology at NYU Langone Medical Center. - NYU Cancer Institute. Dr. Grossman expressed his gratitude to the guests for their generous contributions. Lori Fink, Chair of the NYU Cancer Institute Advisory Board, and trustee of NYU Langone Medical Center. - NYU Cancer Institute since 2003, said, "We are thrilled to celebrate our immensely gifted honoree, Silvia Formenti, whose innovations in science and clinical care are nothing short of groundbreaking. I'd also like to express my gratitude to each of you-our friends, our supporters, and our staff-who make the NYU Cancer Institute a place unlike any other. You are the reason we are able to help cancer patients from all over, who come here because they know that we offer the absolute best in research, education, and especially patient care."
More: smugmug.com

 

Washington Square News

October 5
NYU Langone Study Introduces Possible Answer To Leukemia - By Kimberly Iwanski
A new study performed by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center has found a promising link between an immune-response protein and the progression of a deadly form of childhood leukemia. The link is between "T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia" or "T-ALL," and the protein NF-kB (short for nuclear factor kB). T-ALL affects several hundred children annually, and can be fatal within weeks if left untreated. The study, led by NYU Langone doctor Iannis Aifantis, found that suppressing the activity of NF-kB killed the leukemic cells. Currently, T-ALL is treated with chemotherapy sessions and radiation. The desire to find a better approach to fighting the disease was a driving force behind the research, Aifantis said.
More: nyunews.com

 

WireImage.com

October 5
The 2010 NYU Cancer Institute Gala
The 2010 NYU Cancer Institute Gala took place last night at the Pierre Hotel in New York City. Photos of guests can be viewed on this website.
More: wireimage.com

 

WCBS-TV.com

October 5
HealthWatch: Prostate Cancer
A certain type of ultrasound that is high intensity, high frequency sound waves is powerful enough to heat and destroy tissue. That's been tried before in the prostate. The difference with this new experimental approach is that the sound waves are focused so you achieve higher temperatures and don't cook the entire prostate, minimizing side effects. Stephen Brooks, 62, has battled prostate cancer twice. The first time he was treated with radiation, but when it recurred, Brooks got into a clinical trial using the new treatment. Brooks credits his lower PSA, the marker used to indicate the presence of any remaining prostate cancer, to HIFU treatment, which stands for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound. "It's more acurate at delivering energy only to a specific area without damaging surrounding areas," said Dr. William Huang of the NYU-Langone Medical Center.
More: newyork.cbslocal.com

 

Washington Square News

October 3
NYU-Backed New York Proton Center Will House New Radiation Treatment - By Keith Cagney
A new form of radiation therapy that uses proton beams to control cancer cells will soon be made available in New York, thanks, in part, to NYU. In February, construction will begin on the New York Proton Center, a $235 million undertaking that is being backed by five New York City hospitals, including the NYU Langone Medical Center. The center, which will be built on 57th Street between 11th and 12th avenues, has been in the works since last November when talks began between NYU Langone and the Beth Israel Medical Center, Montefiore Medical Center, Mount Sinai Hospital and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. NYU Langone spokesperson Lisa Greiner said the university believes the center is important for continued investment and research in cancer treatment, including new technologies that are helping to eradicate the disease. "The proton-beam center will complement the services we currently provide and allow us to combat relatively rare cancers and tumors with lower radiation-related side effects than conventional therapies," she said. William Carroll of Langone Medical Center explained it at its most basic level as "a new way of delivering radiation therapy that's a lot more targeted
More: nyunews.com

 


 

September, 2010

 

WFOR-CBS (Miami)

September 24
Energy Waves Knocking Out Prostate Cancer Cells
September is Prostate Cancer Awareness month. Each year over 32,000 men will die from prostate cancer and about 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed during their lifetime with the disease -- the second most common type of cancer in men. Clinical trials are underway on a minimally invasive treatment for prostate cancer. The technology uses high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or high energy sound waves, to safely destroy prostate cancer cells without radiation. Men with recurring prostate cancer can enroll in the clinical trial at NYU Langone Medical Center, the first academic site in the United States to begin enrolling men into clinical trials for HIFU and its faculty member serves as the national medical monitor for one of the FDA clinical trials for this technology.
More: cbs4.com

 

WSJ.com

September 22
Proton Cancer Center Planned - By Suzanne Sataline
New York City could soon become one of the few places in the country to zap cancer cells with a new, and controversial, type of radiation therapy using proton beams. State health officials are expected to decide in the next few weeks whether or not to approve the New York Proton Center, a proposed nonprofit corporation backed by a for-profit company and five New York hospitals: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; Beth Israel Medical Center; New York University Langone Medical Center; The Mount Sinai Hospital, all in Manhattan; and Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx.
- NYU Langone Medical Center
More: online.wsj.com

 

US News & World Report

September 21
Health Buzz: Safe Tanning Predicts Risky Tanning, Study Says - By Angela Haupt
About 1 in 10 teens has used a sunless tanning product, like spray tan or self-tanner-a safer way to get that sun-kissed look, a new study suggests. But those same teens are nearly three times more likely than their peers to visit indoor tanning salons and to suffer multiple sunburns each summer, according to a study published in September's Archives of Dermatology. American Cancer Society researchers surveyed 1,600 adolescents ages 11 to 18 and found that sunless tanning products were most popular among older girls. Jennifer Stein, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center says, "The body can repair some of the DNA damage caused by excess sun exposure on its own." To be on the safe side, she also recommends checking your skin every few months for new spots, moles that bleed, or growths that have changed in shape, color, or size. Not only do these checks help catch skin cancer early, but they can also help spot precancers, which can be removed before they turn malignant. "[Suspicious] growths tend to look rough, scaly, and pink," says Stein.
- Jennifer Stein, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
More: usnews.com

 

Zeenews.com

September 13
Protein that Helps Growth of Childhood Cancer Found
Scientists have identified a protein that plays a crucial role in the progression of a devastating form of childhood cancer called T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), a finding that could lead to new drugs for treating the disease. Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center found that the protein called NF-kB (short for nuclear factor kB), which is crucial for the immune response, appears to be a key player in the progression of T-ALL -- the most common type of cancer in children. The researchers, who detailed their study in the journal Cancer Cell, also found that when the activities of the protein were suppressed it killed the leukemic cells, opening a potential avenue to new drugs that could prevent progression of the disease. "We are very excited about this discovery because small molecule drugs that block this protein are already in development," said lead researcher Iannis Aifantis, PhD, director of the Cancer Stem Cell Program at the NYU Cancer Institute. "We plan to continue to study these inhibitors in the laboratory with the aim of evaluating the feasibility of testing such drugs in patients."
- Iannis Aifantis, PhD, associate professor, Department of Pathology
More: zeenews.com

 

ABC World News Tonight

September 10
Cutting Edge Medicine Can Treat Cancer - By Richard Besser, MD
Harvey Pass, MD discussed cancer genomics and the fact that cancers that look identical may be completely different at the molecular level. "We can look at the genes and the protein to see what is wrong with that tumor and see if these genes are telling us which targeted therapies to use," said Dr. Pass.
- Harvey I. Pass, MD, professor, Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Surgery
More: abcnews.go.com

 

FoxNews.com

September 9
Are We Winning the War on Cancer? - By Dr. Manny Alvarez
In 1971, President Richard Nixon declared war on cancer. Each year, the government spends almost $5 billion researching cancer and a possible cure. And while the medical community appears to be gaining the upper hand on this horrific disease, we have yet to reach the ultimate goal - eliminating it once and for all. Now, almost 40 years later, we doctors here at Fox News wanted to see just how much progress has been made, and if in fact, this is a war we are winning. On Sunday, September 12, Fox News Channel will bring you the one-hour special: "FOX NEWS REPORTING: Winning the War on Cancer" at 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. ET, to take an intimate look at a disease that touches all of our lives in one way or another. We talked to some of the country's leading cancer experts including: oncologists, doctors and patients from NYU Langone Medical Center.
- Richard Shapiro, MD, associate professor, Department of Surgery, NYU Cancer Institute
- Amy D. Tiersten MD, associate professor. Medicine

More: health.blogs.foxnews.com

 

TravelandTransitions.com

September 10
Weight a Factor in Breast Cancer Risk After HRT Use
Another analysis of data on hormone therapy use among U.S. women finds that the panorama of risks is even more complex than previously thought: Thinner women taking it showed a higher risk of developing breast cancer than heavier women. "This gives us a clear correlation between the length of treatment and risk," said Freya Schnabel, MD, director of breast surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Ad hoc, people had made the assumption that, for the most part, shorter was better, but this definitely gives you some parameters on that."
- Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, NYU Cancer Institute
More: travelandtransitons.com

 

Science Magazine

September 8
Weight a Factor in Breast Cancer Risk After HRT Use - By Amanda Gardner
Another analysis of data on hormone therapy use among U.S. women finds that the panorama of risks is even more complex than previously thought: Thinner women taking it showed a higher risk of developing breast cancer than heavier women. The California researchers also found that the longer a woman used either estrogen-alone therapy or estrogen-plus-progestin therapy, the higher the risk of disease. Similar results were seen for women who used combined therapy continuously rather than taking breaks during the month. "This gives us a clear correlation between the length of treatment and risk," said Dr. Freya Schnabel, director of breast surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Ad hoc, people had made the assumption that, for the most part, shorter was better, but this definitely gives you some parameters on that."
- Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, NYU Cancer Institute
More: sciencemagnews.com

 

Medscape

September 8
Hallucinogen May Reduce Cancer Anxiety - By Nick Mulcahy
Psilocybin, a hallucinogen that occurs naturally in "magic mushrooms," appears to be a safe and possibly effective treatment for anxiety in patients with advanced-stage cancer, say California researchers. A 12-patient pilot study conducted at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, California, showed that a single experience with the drug was associated with a significant reduction in anxiety at 1 and 3 months after treatment and improvement of mood that reached significance at 6 months. There is a similar study being conducted at NYU School of Medicine. Both of these studies are now enrolling cancer patients.
- NYU School of Medicine
More: medscape.com

 

NY Daily News

September 8
Ingredient In 'Magic Mushrooms' May Help Relieve Anxiety In Terminal Cancer Patients: Study - By Rosemary Black
Hidden inside 'magic mushrooms' is a substance that could help very ill cancer patients spend their last months more peacefully. The psychedelic drug, known as psilocybin, got a bad rap in the 60s when it was used widely for nonmedical purposes. It helps patients feel less anxious and depressed, according to research reported by the Los Angeles Times. But the pilot study, which focused on a dozen patients, found that one small dose of psilocybin helped patients function better for up to six months. "This is a landmark study in many ways," Stephen Ross, MD, clinical director of NYU Langone Medical Center's Center of Excellence on Addiction, told the Los Angeles Times. Ross, who was not involved in the research, added, "This is the first time a paper like this has come out in a prestigious psychiatric journal in 40 years."
- Stephen Ross, MD, clinical director, Center of Excellence on Addiction and assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry
More: nydailynews.com

 

eHow.com

September 7
The Best Dermatology Hospitals - By Alissa Kinney
Dermatology encompasses everything from making hands look ageless to the treatment of disfiguring skin diseases.Though many think of dermatology as a purely cosmetic field of medicine, there are a number of serious and debilitating diseases that require top-notch care from dermatologists and clinics that specialize in dermatological (skin) care. Some diseases treated by dermatologists include acne, eczema, rosacea, psoriasis and skin cancer. The best dermatology treatment centers offer top-of-the-line care for these conditions as well as less serious cosmetic
NYU Langone Medical Center, which houses the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, is part of the NYU network of hospitals and clinics in New York City's Lower Manhattan. The Ronald O. Perelman Department is internationally recognized for its top-notch dermatology professors and the NYU Langone Medical Center reflects this excellence in the care it offers.
- The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
More: ehow.com

 

AOL Health

September 7
Hallucinogen in 'Magic Mushrooms' May Help Cancer Sufferers - By Amber Greviskes
Hallucinogenic mushrooms have long been used as recreational drugs. But new research claims that not only do they appear to be safe, they may actually help late-stage cancer patients who have high anxiety levels. A forthcoming study in the Archives of General Psychiatry says the hallucinogen psilocybin may improve patients' mood. Now researchers, including a team from NYU School of Medicine and the Los Angeles group whose report will be published in January 2011, are trying to determine whether psilocybin and other hallucinogens should be accessible to patients and who might benefit from taking them.
- NYU School of Medicine
More: aolhealth.com

 

Discover Magazine Blog

September 7
Active Ingredient in "Magic Mushrooms" Could Help Cancer Patients
Hallucinogenic drugs are making a comeback-not among the restless youth of today, but among medical researchers. Doctors are increasingly testing illegal drugs like LSD, psychedelic mushrooms, and the party drug ketamine for beneficial effects, and are suggesting that these discredited drugs could have a place in modern medicine. The latest study, published in the Archives of General Psychiatry, found that the active ingredient in hallucinogenic mushrooms helped alleviate depression and anxiety in terminal cancer patients."This is a landmark study in many ways," said Stephen Ross, MD, clinical director of the Center of Excellence on Addiction at NYU Langone Medical Center, who was not involved in the research. "This is the first time a paper like this has come out in a prestigious psychiatric journal in 40 years." [Los Angeles Times]
- Stephen Ross, MD, clinical director, Center of Excellence on Addiction and assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry
More: blogs.discovermagazine.com

 

 

Los Angeles Times

September 7
'Magic Mushrooms' Ingredient Beneficial To Cancer Patients, Report Says- By Thomas H. Maugh II
The psychedelic drug psilocybin, the active ingredient in "magic mushrooms," can improve mood and reduce anxiety and depression in terminal cancer patients, Los Angeles researchers reported Monday. A single modest dose of the hallucinogen, whose reputation was severely tarnished by widespread nonmedical use in the psychedelic '60s and ethical lapses by researchers such as Timothy Leary, can improve patients' functioning for as long as six months, allowing them to spend their last days with more peace, researchers said. "This is a landmark study in many ways," said Stephen Ross, MD, clinical director of the Center of Excellence on Addiction at NYU Langone Medical Center, who was not involved in the research. "This is the first time a paper like this has come out in a prestigious psychiatric journal in 40 years."
- Stephen Ross, MD, clinical director, Center of Excellence on Addiction and assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry
More: latimes.com, seattletimes.nwsource.com, patdollard.com, southflorida.sun-sentinel.com, heraldnet.com, gazettenet.com, chicagotribune.com, timesleader.com

 

WBZ-TV Boston (CBS)

September 6
(Broadcast story also appeared on WKRCDT-CW CINCINNATI, OH, KGPE-CBS FRESNO-VISALIA, CA, WTVR-CBS RICHMOND-PETERSBURG, VA, WSBT-CBS SOUTH BEND-ELKHART, IN, WANE-CBS FT. WAYNE, IN, KTVN-CBS RENO, NV,, KXJB-CBS FARGO-VALLEY CITY, ND, WTRF-CBS WHEELING, WV, KTVQ-CBS BILLINGS, MT, KREX-CBS GRAND JUNCTION-MONTROSE, CO and KRTV-CBS GREAT FALLS, MT.)
Experimental Drug Shows Promise in Melanoma Patients
This Friday, CBS will be participating in Stand Up to Cancer - a program raising money and awareness about the disease. An experimental drug to treat advanced melanoma is on the FDA's fast track for approval. And while only one in five patients responds to this treatment, in some cases the results are stunning. The New Jersey teacher's dark hair started turning white several months ago as a side effect of an experimental drug he took to treat his stage four melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer. The drug is called Ipilimumab -- or "IPI" for short. A recent study found in about 20 percent of patients who took it, it added a year or more to their lives. It works by supercharging the body's own immune system to fight the cancer. Ipilimumab doesn't work for everyone. But the patients treated at NYU whose hair and eyelashes turned all white later had their tumors shrink completely -- remarkably giving them their lives back. "This is clearly your immune system that's attacking melanocytes," says Anna Pavlick. DO, of the NYU Cancer Institute. "Melanocytes are the cells that not only cause melanoma, but cause you to have pigmentation."
- Anna Pavlick, DO, associate professor, Departments of Medicine and Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, director, NYU Melanoma Program, NYU Cancer Institute

 

CBS Newspath

September 6
(CBS News broadcast story also appeared on WKRCDT2-CW CINCINNATI, OH, WTKR-CBS NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH-NEWPORT NEWS, VA, WGHP-FOX GREENSBORO-HIGH POINT-WINSTON SALEM, NC, KGPE-CBS FRESNO-VISALIA, CA, KOTV-CBS TULSA, OK, WOWK CHARLESTON-HUNTINGTON, WV, WDBJ-CBS ROANOKE-LYNCHBURG, VA, WDBJ-CBS ROANOKE-LYNCHBURG, VA, KMTV-CBS OMAHA, NE, KMTV-CBS OMAHA, NE, KFVS-CBS PADUCAH, KY - CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO, KWTX-CBS WACO-TEMPLE-BRYAN, TX, WSBT-CBS SOUTH BEND-ELKHART, IN, KKTV COLORADO SPRINGS-PUEBLO, CO, WJHL-CBS TRI-CITIES, TN-VA, WCAX-CBS BURLINGTON, VT, KDBC-CBS EL PASO, TX, KOLN-CBS LINCOLN-HASTINGS-KEARNEY, NE, KOLN-CBS LINCOLN-HASTINGS-KEARNEY, NE, KYTX-CBS TYLER-LONGVIEW-LUFKIN-NACOGDOCHES, TX, WSHM-CBS SPRINGFIELD-HOLYOKE, MA, WLNS-CBS LANSING, MI,, WMBD-CBS PEORIA-BLOOMINGTON, IL, WWTV-CBS TRAVERSE CITY-CADILLAC, MI, KKFX-FOX SANTA BARBARA-SANTA MARIA-SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA, KBAK-CBS BAKERSFIELD, CA, WCBI-CBS COLUMBUS-TUPELO-WEST POINT, MS, KTVL-CBS MEDFORD-KLAMATH FALLS, OR, WBOC-CBS SALISBURY, MD, KAUZ-CBS WICHITA FALLS, TX-LAWTON, OK, KTVA-CBS ANCHORAGE, AK, KIMT-CBS ROCHESTER, MN - MASON CITY, IA, KHQA QUINCY, IL - HANNIBAL, MO, KGWN-CBS CHEYENNE, WY-SCOTTSBLUFF, NE, KLST-CBS SAN ANGELO, TX, and KTNL-CBS JUNEAU, AK.)
Experimental Drug Shows Promise in Melanoma Patients
This Friday, CBS will be participating in Stand Up to Cancer - a program raising money and awareness about the disease. An experimental drug to treat advanced melanoma is on the FDA's fast track for approval. And while only one in five patients responds to this treatment, in some cases the results are stunning. The New Jersey teacher's dark hair started turning white several months ago as a side effect of an experimental drug he took to treat his stage four melanoma -- the deadliest type of skin cancer. The drug is called Ipilimumab -- or "IPI" for short. A recent study found in about 20 percent of patients who took it, it added a year or more to their lives. It works by supercharging the body's own immune system to fight the cancer. Ipilimumab doesn't work for everyone. But the patients treated at NYU whose hair and eyelashes turned all white later had their tumors shrink completely -- remarkably giving them their lives back. "This is clearly your immune system that's attacking melanocytes," says Anna Pavlick. DO, of the NYU Cancer Institute. "Melanocytes are the cells that not only cause melanoma, but cause you to have pigmentation."
- Anna Pavlick, DO, associate professor, Departments of Medicine and Ronald O. Perelman
Department of Dermatology, director, NYU Melanoma Program, NYU Cancer Institute

More: ozarksfirst.com, keyc.com

 

CancerNetwork.com

September 1
People & Places - Who's News: Around Town
ASTRO has named NYU Langone Medical Center’s Eileen Connolly, MD, PhD as this year’s recipient of the Residents/Fellows in Radiation Oncology Research Seed Grant Awards. The grants are awarded for a one-year project and are in amounts of up to $25,000 each.
- Eileen Connolly, MD, PhD, Department of Microbiology, NYU Langone Medical Center
More: cancernetwork.com

 

MORE Magazine

September 2010
Surprising Breast Cancer Risk - The Question You Should ask you at your Next Mammogram - By Peg Rosen
Mammograms are significantly less sensitive at diagnosing cancer in dense breasts, which contain a large amount of glandular and connective tissue, than in breasts with a higher proportion of fatty tissue. Now new research raises an additional concern: For reasons that are not yet explained, having dense breasts increases—as much as four- or fivefold—a woman’s chances of developing breast cancer. While a woman’s breasts tend to get less glandular as she grows older, a significant percentage of postmenopausal women still have dense ones. Also, hormone therapy may increase density. Researchers are investigating interventions, such as the estrogen receptor blocker tamoxifen, that might decrease breast density. But for now? At your next mammogram, ask for an assessment of your breast density. “If your breasts are considered dense and you have other risk factors, like a family history of breast cancer, you may not want to rely solely on a mammogram for screening. Ultrasound and other options should be explored,” suggests Freya Schnabel, MD, director of breast surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center.
- Freya Schnabel, professor, Department of Surgery
More: more.com

 


 

August, 2010

 

MedPage Today

August 31
Preventive Surgery Works for BRCA Mutation Carriers - By Crystal Phend
Prophylactic surgery can reduce the high risk of breast and ovarian cancer among BRCA mutation carriers and actually improve survival, researchers affirmed. Overall, the new data likely won't change practice but are good to have, commented Freya Schnabel, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "The reduction in mortality may have been something we assumed to be true -- now we have data that is confirmatory," she said in an e-mail to MedPage Today and ABC News.
- Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, NYU Cancer Institute
More: medpagetoday.com

 

HealthFinder.gov

August 31
Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast, Ovarian Cancer Revealed - By Amanda Gardner
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in isolating the lengthy protein encoded by the BRCA2 gene. Dysfunction of this gene can up the risk for both breast and ovarian cancer. By separating the protein from the rest of the components of human cells, researchers were able to study it more closely and figure out exactly what it does in the body." Everybody has a BRCA gene. You need it because it functions as a tumor-suppressor gene," explained Julia Smith, MD, director of the Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention Program at NYU Cancer Institute in New York City. "Abnormal cells that could become tumor cells are popping up all the time and we have lots and lots of repair mechanisms and corrective mechanisms to bump off those cells so they can't divide and behave badly."
- Julia Smith, MD, PhD, clinical assistant professor, NYU Cancer Institute
More: HealthFinder.gov

 

Genetics Times

August 31
Scientists are First to Sequence the Genomes of 2 Ant Species
Scientists have finally sequenced the entire genome of an ant, actually two very different species of ant, and the insights gleaned from their genetic blueprints are already yielding tantalizing clues to the extraordinary social behavior of ants. A result of a ground-breaking collaborative research project led by Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor of biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, the analysis of the genomes is published in the August 27, 2010 issue of Science. "Ants are extremely social creatures and their ability to survive depends on their community in a very similar way to humans," said Dr. Reinberg, who is also a member of the NYU Cancer Institute. "Whether they are workers, soldiers or queens, ants seem to be a perfect fit to study whether epigenetics influences behavior and aging." "After the honey bee, ants are the second family of social insects to have their genome sequenced," said Roberto Bonasio, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center and one of the co-authors of the study. "The next challenge is to start manipulating the genome of ants so that we can learn the function of specific genes related to aging and behavior."
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
- Roberto Bonasio, PhD, Department of Biochemistry

More: geneticstimes.com

 

Crain's New York Business

August 31
NY's Stem Cell Researchers Seek Private Cash - By Barbara Benson
New York is home to many research labs that use stem cells-and all are affected by the recent ruling by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia that placed a preliminary injunction preventing federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research. "Einstein, NYU, Weill-Cornell, Columbia, Rockefeller-they have stem cell researchers, and all are dependent on stem cell funding and various degrees of private funding," said Susan Solomon, executive director of the New York Stem Cell Foundation, calling the court ruling "devastating."
- NYU Langone Medical Center
More: crainsnewyork.com

 

UroToday

August 31
Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing And Prostate Cancer Screening
Prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening is an integral part of current screening for prostate cancer. Together with digital rectal examinations, it is recommended annually by the American Cancer Society. PSA screening has resulted in a significant stage migration in the past decades. Different forms of PSA, including free PSA, volume adjusted, complexed, intact, or pro-PSA, are being used in the screening process. Other aspects of the screening process include age at diagnosis, survival, overdiagnosis, and overtreatment. Recent studies have cast doubt on whether PSA screening positively affects mortality and how the quality of life of patients may be affected by screening. Future considerations include the need for more longitudinal studies as well as further study of the PSA components that may become more relevant in the future.
- Department of Urology, NYU Langone Medical Center
More: urotoday.com

 

The Daily Star

August 30
Ant Genome Unraveled
Reporting on the sequencing of the first two ant genomes, scientists say their work can help them understand variations in appearance, biology and social roles within colonies as well as differences between ant species. The research, they say, could also clear a path to better understanding genes' effects on social behavior, neurobiology and life-span in other animals. "This study opens doors for a completely new system where now we can study behavior among ants and social insects," says study coauthor Danny Reinberg, a biochemist at the NYU School of Medicine. The research appears in the Aug. 27 Science. Ants live in colonies with queens and specialized workers of various types, each of which has a different set of biological and behavioral traits. Queens are larger than worker ants, can live 10 years or more and lay eggs all their lives. Shorter-lived workers have more complex behaviors and use more brainpower to forage and maintain the colony. But all the individuals in a colony have the same genetic blueprints. That means differences among individuals depend on how genes are turned on and off, or cranked up or down, rather than the actual DNA. So scientists want to use ants to study how differences in genes and gene activity bring about changes in aging, behavior and brain activity.
-Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
-Roberto Bonasio, PhD, Department of Biochemistry

More: thedailystar.net

 

Medical Daily

August 30
Genomes of Ant Sequenced
Scientists have finally sequenced the entire genome of an ant, actually two very different species of ant, and the insights gleaned from their genetic blueprints are already yielding tantalizing clues to the extraordinary social behavior of ants. A result of a ground-breaking collaborative research project led by Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor of biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, the analysis of the genomes is published in the August 27, 2010 issue of Science. "Ants are extremely social creatures and their ability to survive depends on their community in a very similar way to humans," said Dr. Reinberg, who is also a member of the NYU Cancer Institute. "Whether they are workers, soldiers or queens, ants seem to be a perfect fit to study whether epigenetics influences behavior and aging." "After the honey bee, ants are the second family of social insects to have their genome sequenced," said Roberto Bonasio, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center and one of the co-authors of the study. "The next challenge is to start manipulating the genome of ants so that we can learn the function of specific genes related to aging and behavior."
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
- Roberto Bonasio, PhD, Department of Biochemistry

More: medicaldaily.com

 

Bionity.com

August 30
NYU Langone Scientists Are First To Sequence The Genomes Of 2 Ant Species
"Ants are extremely social creatures and their ability to survive depends on their community in a very similar way to humans," said Dr. Reinberg, who is also a member of the NYU Cancer Institute. "Whether they are workers, soldiers or queens, ants seem to be a perfect fit to study whether epigenetics influences behavior and aging." "After the honey bee, ants are the second family of social insects to have their genome sequenced," said Roberto Bonasio, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center and one of the co-authors of the study. "The next challenge is to start manipulating the genome of ants so that we can learn the function of specific genes related to aging and behavior."
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
- Roberto Bonasio, PhD, Department of Biochemistry

More: bionity.com

 

Agence France Press (AFP)

August 28
Scientists Sequence Ant Genomes For The First Time
US scientists said Friday they have mapped the entire genome sequences of two different species of ants for the first time, potentially providing insight into human ageing and behavior. "Ants are extremely social creatures and their ability to survive depends on their community in a very similar way to humans," said research project leader Danny Reinberg, a professor of biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center. "Whether they are workers, soldiers or queens, ants seem to be a perfect fit to study whether epigenetics influences behavior and aging."
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
More: google.com, biocompare.com, rawstory.com, firstscience.com, sciencedaily.com, molecularstation.com, scienceblog.com, physorg.com, cosmosmagazine.com, chinapost.com.tw, france24.com

 

US News & World Report

August 27
Unraveling Ant Genomes Yields High Hopes - By Gwyneth Dickey, Science News
Reporting on the sequencing of the first two ant genomes, scientists say their work can help them understand variations in appearance, biology and social roles within colonies as well as differences between ant species. The research, they say, could also clear a path to better understanding genes' effects on social behavior, neurobiology and life-span in other animals.
"This study opens doors for a completely new system where now we can study behavior among ants and social insects," says study coauthor Danny Reinberg, a biochemist at the NYU School of Medicine. The research appears in the Aug. 27 Science.
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
More: usnews.com

 

Softpedia

August 27
Genomes of Two Separate Ant Species Sequenced - By Tudor Vieru, Editor
An international collaboration of scientists has just released the results of a new investigation, which managed to sequence the full genomes of two socially-divergent ant species. The finding can be used to derive more data on the role of epigenetics in aging and behavior. The international research effort was led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Danny Reinberg, who is a professor of biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center. Details of the work were published in the August 27 issue of Science. "Ants are extremely social creatures and their ability to survive depends on their community in a very similar way to humans. Whether they are workers, soldiers or queens, ants seem to be a perfect fit to study whether epigenetics influences behavior and aging," explains Reinberg, who also holds an appointment as a member of the NYU Cancer Institute. "In studying the genomes of these two ants, we were fascinated by the different behaviors and different roles that the worker ants develop," he adds.
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
More: softpedia.com

 

Science Daily

(Also Health News Digest, PhysOrg, EScience News, Plataformas)
August 26
Genomes of Two Ant Species Sequenced: Clues to Their Extraordinary Social Behavior
Scientists have finally sequenced the entire genome of an ant, actually two very different species of ant, and the insights gleaned from their genetic blueprints is already yielding tantalizing clues to the extraordinary social behavior of ants. A result of a ground-breaking collaborative research project led by Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor of biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, the analysis of the genomes is published in Science. "Ants are extremely social creatures and their ability to survive depends on their community in a very similar way to humans," said Dr. Reinberg, who is also a member of the NYU Cancer Institute. "Whether they are workers, soldiers or queens, ants seem to be a perfect fit to study whether epigenetics influences behavior and aging." Roberto Bonasio, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center and one of the co-authors of the study added, "After the honey bee, ants are the second family of social insects to have their genome sequenced. The next challenge is to start manipulating the genome of ants so that we can learn the function of specific genes related to aging and behavior."
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
- Roberto Bonasio, PhD, Department of Biochemistry

More: sciencedaily.com, sciencedaily.com, healthnewsdigest.com, physorg.com, plataformasinc.es

 

ScienceNews.org

August 26
Unraveling Ant Genomes Yields High Hopes: Study May Open Doors to new Insights into Behavior, Life-Span Species -By Gwyneth Dickey
Reporting on the sequencing of the first two ant genomes, scientists say their work can help them understand variations in appearance, biology and social roles within colonies as well as differences between ant species. The research, they say, could also clear a path to better understanding genes' effects on social behavior, neurobiology and life-span in other animals. "This study opens doors for a completely new system where now we can study behavior among ants and social insects," says study coauthor Danny Reinberg, PhD, a biochemist at the NYU School of Medicine. The research appears in the Aug. 27 Science.
- Danny Reinberg, PhD, professor, Department of Biochemistry
More: sciencenews.org, esciencenews.com

 

Tehran Times

August 25
Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast, Ovarian Cancer Revealed - By Amanda Gardner, Health Day News
Continued coverage of report that scientists have succeeded in isolating the lengthy protein encoded by the BRCA2 gene. Dysfunction of this gene can up the risk for both breast and ovarian cancer. By separating the protein from the rest of the components of human cells, researchers were able to study it more closely and figure out exactly what it does in the body. Although the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were discovered some 15 years ago, scientists have had trouble deciphering their inner workings. "Everybody has a BRCA gene. You need it because it functions as a tumor-suppressor gene," explained Julia Smith, MD, director of the Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention Program at NYU Cancer Institute in New York City. "Abnormal cells that could become tumor cells are popping up all the time and we have lots and lots of repair mechanisms and corrective mechanisms to bump off those cells so they can't divide and behave badly."
- Julia Smith, MD, PhD, clinical assistant professor, NYU Cancer Institute
More: tehrantimes.com

 

Savannah Morning News

August 24
Cancer Center Launches 'Mole Mapping' Program - By Dana Clark Felty
Digital photo technology used to catch signs of skin cancer earlier: After two surgeries to remove the mole and other potentially cancerous tissue that developed while stationed in Qatar, Staff Sgt. Sam Hoover must now closely monitor any changes in the other spots and freckles covering his body. To help, he has become one of the first to use a new form of screening technology available at St. Joseph's/Candler's Nancy N. and J.C. Lewis Cancer & Research Pavilion. The process of "mole mapping" involves using digital cameras and computer software to photograph and track visible changes in moles over time. "If you detect it early and treat it early, it's no big deal," said Darrell Rigel, MD, a past president of the AAD and a professor of dermatology and NYU Langone Medical Center. "Once melanoma has spread, nothing works. A melanoma the size of a dime on your skin has a 50 percent chance of already having spread."
- Darrell Rigel, MD, clinical professor, Ronald O. Perlman Department of Dermatology
More: savannahnow.com

 

Crain's New York Business

August 22
Soaring Cancer-Care Costs Strain Budgets - By Judith Messina
For a consortium of six of New York City's leading hospitals that is preparing to splash out tens of millions of dollars for the latest and greatest cancer killer- a massive machine that zaps tumors with finely focused proton beams-the logic is clear. "For patients for whom proton therapy is better, we have a mandate to provide that therapy," says Dr. William Carroll, director of the NYU Cancer Institute. But Dr. Carroll also warns, "Technology is always changing, so we have to be careful about getting sucked into it." says Dr. Carroll. The staggering price of providing cutting-edge treatment is driving one major collaboration: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Beth Israel Medical Center, NYU Langone Medical Center and Montefiore Medical Center have joined with a commercial radiation provider, 21st Century Oncology, to build a $227 million proton therapy center.
- William Carroll, MD, Julie and Edward J. Minskoff Professor of Pediatrics, Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, and director, NYU Cancer Institute and Pediatric Hematology Oncology Program
More: crainsnewyork.com

 

Health Day

(Also US News & World Report, MSN Health & Fitness, Yahoo! News, HealthFinder, Poudre Valley Health System, Meridian Health, Alegent Health)
August 22
Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast, Ovarian Cancer Revealed - By Amanda Gardner
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in isolating the lengthy protein encoded by the BRCA2 gene. Dysfunction of this gene can up the risk for both breast and ovarian cancer. By separating the protein from the rest of the components of human cells, researchers were able to study it more closely and figure out exactly what it does in the body. Although the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were discovered some 15 years ago, scientists have had trouble deciphering their inner workings. "Everybody has a BRCA gene. You need it because it functions as a tumor-suppressor gene," explained Dr. Julia Smith, director of the Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention Program at NYU Cancer Institute in New York City. "Abnormal cells that could become tumor cells are popping up all the time and we have lots and lots of repair mechanisms and corrective mechanisms to bump off those cells so they can't divide and behave badly."
- Julia Smith, MD, PhD, clinical assistant professor, NYU Cancer Institute
More: health-quest.org, usnews.com, health.msn.com, yahoo.com, healthfinder.gov, pvhs.org, meridianhealth.com, alegent.com

 

Science Magazine

August 21
Vascular-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer - Posted by admin
"This minimally invasive technique for localized prostate cancer offers the potential to destroy the cancer without making any incision or causing any potentially devastating sexual, urinary or reproductive side-effects," said Samir S. Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology and director of the Division of Urologic Oncology at NYU Langone Medical Center and principal investigator for the national, multi-center clinical trial testing this technology. "This procedure only treats the cancerous part of the prostate gland, similar to how a lumpectomy might be done for breast cancer. Photodynamic therapy is just one of the many personalized treatment options offered by the Smilow Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. The Center offers a wide range of the latest treatment options for prostate cancer including: open or robotic prostatectomy surgery, brachytherapy, external beam radiation therapy, cryotherapy and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), a focal therapy that uses high-energy sound waves to treat prostate cancer, now also in clinical trials at the medical center.
- Samir S. Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology and director of the Division of Urologic Oncology, NYU Cancer Institute
More: sciencemagnews.com

 

Science Magazine

August 20
Jews Around the World Linked by Common Genetic Ancestry - Posted by admin
A new and complex genetic analysis has revealed that Jews all over the world are related by virtue of uniquely shared genetic traits dating back several millennia. Down the line, the finding has the potential to aid in broader investigations on the genetic origins of disease, according to researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and NYU School of Medicine, who present these observations in the June 3 online issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. "The study supports the idea of a Jewish people linked by a shared genetic history," Dr. Harry Ostrer, an NYU professor of pediatrics, pathology and medicine, stated in the news release. "Yet the [mixture] with European people explains why so many European and Syrian Jews have blue eyes and blond hair."
- Harry Ostrer, MD, professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology and Medicine
More: sciencemagnews.com

 

Mesothelioma Cancer News

August 16
Laser Treatment Joins the Fight Against Prostate Cancer
Unlike traditional treatments for Prostate Cancer, like radiation, a new laser treatment targets cancer cells directly without damaging the entire prostate gland. Samir Taneja, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center explains, "The real appeal of this approach is that it's non-invasive", owing to the procedure's light activated drug and thin needles. To date eighteen Prostate Cancer patients have undergone the medical trial, which is now being tested at five centers nationwide.
- Samir Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology, director, Division of Urologic Oncology
More: mesotheliomacancernews.com

 

The New Nation

August 11,12
(Also Medicine.net, Yahoo! News, Bloomberg Businessweek)
Weight a Factor in Breast Cancer Risk
Another analysis of data on hormone therapy use among U.S. women finds that the panorama of risks is even more complex than previously thought: Thinner women taking it showed a higher risk of developing breast cancer than heavier women. The California researchers also found that the longer a woman used either estrogen-alone therapy or estrogen-plus-progestin therapy, the higher the risk of disease. Similar results were seen for women who used combined therapy continuously rather than taking breaks during the month. "This gives us a clear correlation between the length of treatment and risk," said Freya Schnabel, MD, director of breast surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Ad hoc, people had made the assumption that, for the most part, shorter was better, but this definitely gives you some parameters on that." Given that current recommendations on the use of HRT to relieve menopausal symptoms are to use as little as possible for as short a time as possible, Schnabel said, "this supports that and gives a framework for that."
- Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery
More: ittefaq.com, medicinenet.com, yahoo.com, businessweek.com

 

WUSA Channel9

August 10
(Also WRAZ-FOX RALEIGH-DURHAM-FAYETTEVILLE, NC, WTHI-CBS TERRE HAUTE, IN)
New Prostate Cancer Treatment Being Tested
A new treatment for prostate cancer is being put to the test. It uses lasers and lights to try to zap cancer in its tracks. Bill Pupplo was diagnosed with prostate cancer four months ago. Pupplo’s cancer was caught early, so he planned on taking a wait-and-see approach. Then he learned about an experimental treatment at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York, specifically targeting cancer cells. “The real appeal of an approach like this is that it's non invasive,” said Samir Taneja, MD. Thin laser activated needles are positioned over the prostate where cancer cells are identified. The patient is then given a drug activated by light. Once the drug has enough time to find the cancer cells, the lasers zap them. NYU and four other centers nationwide are testing out this new potential treatment. They plan to treat about 30 men. So far, 17 have had the procedure done.
- Samir S. Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology and director of the Division of Urologic Oncology, NYU Cancer Institute
More: wusa9.com

 

Bloomberg BusinessWeek

August 10
(Also HealthDay, MSN.Health, Yahoo! News, Health.USNews, iVillage, Health.com, HealthScout, Bio-Medicine.org, VitaBeat.com, HealthFinder.gov, Drugs.com, Health.Yahoo! Yahoo! News, Alegent.com, HealthLifeSource, BioMedME)Weight a Factor in Breast Cancer Risk After HRT Use - Thinner Women Faced Higher Chance of Malignancies, Review Found By Amanda Gardner, HealthDay Reporter
Another analysis of data on hormone therapy use among U.S. women finds that the panorama of risks is even more complex than previously thought: Thinner women taking it showed a higher risk of developing breast cancer than heavier women. "This gives us a clear correlation between the length of treatment and risk," said Freya Schnabel, MD, director of breast surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Ad hoc, people had made the assumption that, for the most part, shorter was better, but this definitely gives you some parameters on that." Given that current recommendations on the use of HRT to relieve menopausal symptoms are to use as little as possible for as short a time as possible, Schnabel said, "this supports that and gives a framework for that." "There's no question that [the release of information from the WHI] was a cataclysmic moment for HRT in the U.S.," Schnabel said. "A lot fewer women are using it, and what we've seen as a result is that breast cancer rates have gone down, and epidemiologists seem pretty comfortable that it was because of that."
- Freya R. Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery
More: healthday.com, businessweek.com, msn.com, health.com, healthscout.com, bio-medicine.org, vitabeat.com, healthfinder.gov, drugs.com, yahoo.net, yahoo.com, health.com, alegent.com, healthlifesource.com, biomedme.com

 

WRALNews.com

August 8, 9
(Also in WRAL-CBS RALEIGH-DURHAM-FAYETTEVILLE, NC, KMEG-CBS SIOUX CITY, IA, KBAK-CBS BAKERSFIELD, CA, KCCI-CBS DES MOINES-AMES, IA, KSMO-MNT KANSAS CITY, MO)
New Prostate Cancer Treatment Being Tested
A new treatment for prostate cancer is being put to the test. It uses lasers and lights to try to zap cancer in its tracks. Bill Pupplo was diagnosed with prostate cancer four months ago. Pupplo’s cancer was caught early, so he planned on taking a wait-and-see approach. Then he learned about an experimental treatment at Langone Medical Center in New York, specifically targeting cancer cells. “The real appeal of an approach like this is that it's non invasive,” said Samir Taneja, MD. Thin laser activated needles are positioned over the prostate where cancer cells are identified. The patient is then given a drug activated by light. Once the drug has enough time to find the cancer cells, the lasers zap them. NYU and four other centers nationwide are testing out this new potential treatment. They plan to treat about 30 men. So far, 17 have had the procedure done.
- Samir S. Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology and director of the Division of Urologic Oncology, NYU Cancer Institute
More: wral.com

 

WCBS-TV

August 5
New Prostate Cancer Treatment: Photodynamic Therapy – By Dr. Max Gomez
NYU Langone is leading the national multicenter study investigating photodynamic therapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. "Wherever the light meets the drug, blood vessels are destroyed and hopefully the prostate cancer in that location is destroyed as well," said Dr. Samir Taneja, of NYU Langone Medical Center.
- Samir S. Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology and director, Division of Urologic Oncology, NYU Cancer Institute

 

CBS Newspath

August 4
(Story also appeared on local CBS stations across the country including: KCBS, KCAL, WOIO, KOVR, KDKA, WTVF, WFSB, KSMO, WKRC, KLAS, WTKR, KQRE, KEYE, WREG, WPRI, WRGB, KQCW, KOTV, WXCW, WDBJ, WNEM, WFRV, WGME, KFVS, WTVH, KGBT, KBTX, WJTV, WSBT, WJHL, WCSC, KFSM, WNCT, WBTW, KOLN, KTVN, KYTX, WWTV, KCOY, KBAK, KBFX, KFDA, WCBI, WIBW, KNOE, KTVL, KPSP, WBOC, KOAM, KMEG, KIMT, WBNG, KIDK, KPAX, KHQA, WCAV, WLFI, KLST, KDKA, KNOE, KMEG, WBDJ, KITM, WCAV.)
New Treatment Tries to Zap Prostate Cancer Away
A new treatment for prostate cancer is being put to the test. It uses lasers and lights to get rid of cancer. Here's how it works: Thin laser activated needles are positioned over the prostate where cancer cells are identified. The patient is then given a drug that is activated by light. Once the drug has enough time to seek out the cancer cells the lasers are turned on to zap the cells. "Wherever the light meets the drug, blood vessels are destroyed and hopefully the prostate cancer in that location is destroyed as well," said Samir Taneja, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center. A big benefit to this procedure is that it may destroy cancer without causing serious side effects.
- Samir S. Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology and director of the Division of Urologic Oncology, NYU Cancer Institute
More: cbs4.com, wcco.com, kfsm.com

 

News-Medical.net

August 2
NYU PRC Receives $3.2M Award to Establish Comparative Effectiveness Research Program
The NYU Health Promotion and Prevention Research Center (NYU PRC) at the NYU School of Medicine announced it has received a $3.2 million award from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to establish a Comparative Effectiveness Research Program focused on hypertension and colorectal cancer health disparities in African-American men in New York City. The NYU PRC is one of only four of the 37 PRC research facilities nationwide to receive this prestigious award. The study will be led by R. Scott Braithwaite, MD, Joseph Ravenell, MD, Mariano Rey, MD, and Chau Trinh-Shevrin, DrPH. "Addressing health disparities is a top priority for NYU, and this grant teams up our outstanding leaders in comparative effectiveness research with our superb Health Promotion and Prevention Research Center, working closely with community partners, to tackle some of the most important public health issues among African-American men," said Vivian S. Lee, MD, PhD, MBA, senior vice president, vice dean for science and chief scientific officer.
- Vivian S. Lee, MD, PhD, MBA, senior vice president, vice dean for science and chief scientific officer
- R. Scott Braithwaite, MD, associate professor, Department of Medicine
- Ravenell, MD, assistant professor, Department of Medicine
- Mariano Rey, MD, principal investigator of the NYU PRC and director of the NYU Institute of Community Health and Research
- Chau Trinh-Shevrin, DrPH, assistant professor, Department of Medicine

More: ews-medical.net, enterprisepost.com, machala.in, newsblaze.com

 

Crain’s Health Pulse

August 2
The $227 Million Manhattan Project – By Barbara Benson and Gale Scott
The strongest candidate to bring the first proton beam therapy center to New York is a $227 million project at 621 W. 57th St. in Manhattan backed by Memorial Sloan-Kettering, Beth Israel, NYU Langone, Mount Sinai, Montefiore and New York-Presbyterian. The hospitals' partner is 21st Century Oncology, a national developer and operator of about 100 radiation therapy centers. On the clinical side, “there needs to be a consensus on all the protocols and hierarchies of who needs care,” says Andrew Brotman, MD, NYU Langone's senior vice president, vice dean for clinical affairs and strategy, and chief clinical officer.
- Andrew Brotman, MD, senior vice president, vice dean for clinical affairs and strategy, and chief clinical officer, NYU Langone Medical Center
More: crainsnewyork.com

 


 

July, 2010

 

WNYC Radio

July 31
The Human Genome Project - By Sarah Kate Kramer
In an attempt to maximize the results of the genome project, the NIH took an ambitiously broad approach to the research. “Like every scientific discovery, there was hype in the beginning. In this case the hype was extreme, and it extended into the NIH,” says John Pappas, MD, a clinical geneticist at NYU Langone Medical Center. Enthusiasm, and perhaps hubris, led the NIH to spend millions of dollars in studies on the genetic roots of common diseases like diabetes and cancer, in which researchers compared sections of the genomes of hundreds of people, looking for common variations. “These were very expensive studies with very low yield,” says Pappas. A decade later, few treatments can be traced back to these studies, and scientists have found the evolution of common disease to be highly complex and often traced to environmental triggers and a combination of rare genetic variants.
- John G. Pappas, MD, assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics
More: wnyc.org

 

Medical News Today

July 31
The Evolution of Melanoma Diagnosis: 25 Years Beyond The ABCDs
Twenty-five years after publishing the mnemonic "ABCD" to facilitate the early diagnosis of melanoma, the group who came up with that moniker says early detection remains a key factor in lowering mortality from malignant melanoma. Darrell S. Rigel, MD, and colleagues from the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at NYU School of Medicine say that, despite all of the advances in melanoma diagnosis, timely recognition, detection, and rapid treatment of melanoma remain critical. Their report appears online on CA First Look, and will appear in the September/October issue of CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.
- Darrell S. Rigel, MD, clinical professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
More: medicalnewstoday.com, news-fire.com, sciencecentric.com

 

CBS News 2 This Morning

July 29, August 4, 5
(Also in Urosource, CBS4, WCBS-CBS, WWL-CBS New Orleans, WUPL-MNT, New Orleans, WYMT-CBS LEXINGTON, KY, KMTV-CBS OMAHA, NE, WSBT-CBS SOUTH BEND-ELKHART, IN, WTOC-CBS SAVANNAH, GA, KDBC-CBS EL PASO, TX, KFSM-CBS FT. SMITH-FAYETTEVILLE-SPRINGDALE-ROGERS, AR, WANE-CBS FT. WAYNE, IN, WAKA-CBS MONTGOMERY-SELMA, AL, KAUZ-CBS WICHITA FALLS, TX-LAWTON, OK, KOSA-CBS ODESSA-MIDLAND, TX, KXMB-CBS MINOT-BISMARCK-DICKINSON-WILLISTON, ND, KIDK-CBS IDAHO FALLS-POCATELLO, ID, KTVQ-CBS BILLINGS, MT, KHQA QUINCY, IL - HANNIBAL, MO - KEOKUK, IA, KREX-CBS GRAND JUNCTION-MONTROSE, CO, KRTV-CBS GREAT FALLS, MT)
New Treatment Tries to Zap Prostate Cancer Away
A new treatment for prostate cancer is being put to the test. It uses lasers and lights to get rid of cancer. Here's how it works: Thin laser activated needles are positioned over the prostate where cancer cells are identified. The patient is then given a drug that is activated by light. Once the drug has enough time to seek out the cancer cells the lasers are turned on to zap the cells. "Wherever the light meets the drug, blood vessels are destroyed and hopefully the prostate cancer in that location is destroyed as well," said Samir Taneja, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center. A big benefit to this procedure is that it may destroy cancer without causing serious side effects.
- Samir S. Taneja, MD, The James M. Neissa and Janet Riha Neissa Associate Professor of Urologic Oncology, Department of Urology
More: cbs4.com, urosource.com

 

ScienceDaily

July 18
New Genomics-Based Approach to Understand Origin of Cancer Subgroups
Scientists have long recognized that cancers may look the same under the microscope, but carry different mutations, respond differently to treatment and result in vastly different outcomes for patients. Now St. Jude researchers have developed a new approach that uses genomic information from different species to understand the biology that drives the formation of these different cancer subtypes. The approach was developed by studying a tumor called ependymoma that affects the brains and spines of children and adults, but may also translate to other forms of cancer. The research demonstrates for the first time that ependymomas in different regions of the nervous system arise when subtypes of stem cells found there acquire specific mutations. The research also led to discovery of the first gene, called EPHB2, proven to cause ependymoma. The research was published in the advance online publication of the scientific journal Nature. One of the co-authors was Jeffrey Allen, MD, of NYU Langone Medical Center, New York.
-Jeffrey C. Allen, MD, Otto and Marguerite Manley and Making Headway Foundation Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics and professor of Neuro-Oncology, Department of Neurology
More: sciencedaily.com

 

SCIENCE MAGAZINE

JUNE
Who Are the Jews? Genetic Studies Spark Identity Debate - By Michael Balter
Two new studies conclude that most members of the far-flung Jewish Diaspora can trace their roots to ancestors who lived in the Middle East more than 2000 years ago. The new research, based on recent advances in genome technology, apparently refutes controversial claims that most of today's Jews descend from more recent converts. And it finds that Jews in Ethiopia and India who also claim origins in ancient Israel are more distantly related to other Jewish groups. Yet some researchers argue that although science can track Jewish ancestry, it has little to say about who is a Jew today. The studies "clearly show a genetic common ancestry" of most Jewish populations, says Sarah Tishkoff, a geneticist at the University of Pennsylvania, thus indicating a distinct Jewish people through history. Indeed, says Harry Ostrer, MD, a geneticist at NYU School of Medicine and leader of one of the teams, the genomewide scans used in the studies can detect Jewish ancestry in anonymous DNA samples. But Doron Behar, a geneticist at the Rambam Health Care Campus in Haifa, Israel, and lead author of the second report, argues that genes do not necessarily make the Jew. There is no "metaphysical" difference between someone born Jewish and a convert to Judaism, Behar says.
- Harry Ostrer, MD, professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pathology, Department of Medicine, Division of Human Genetics
More: sciencemag.org

 

Advance for Imaging and Radiation Oncology

July 15
Five Awarded ASTRO Research Grants
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has selected five physicians as recipients of two grants funded by the Radiation Oncology Institute - the Junior Faculty Career Research Training Award and the Residents/Fellows in Radiation Oncology Research Seed Grant Award. Winners were selected by ASTRO's Research Evaluation Committee. The Residents/Fellows in Radiation Oncology Research Seed Grant Award is given to support residents or fellows who are planning a career focusing primarily on basic science or clinical research. The grants are awarded each year for a one-year project and are in amounts of up to $25,000 each. This year's recipients are Eileen Connolly, MD, PhD, of the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York.
- Eileen Connelly, MD, PhD
More: advanceweb.com

 

EscapeCancer.com

July 15
Prevention Steps for Breast & Ovarian Cancer
Interview with Julia A. Smith, MD, PhD, Director of Breast Cancer Screening & Prevention and clinical assistant professor/medical oncologist at the NYU Cancer Institute at NYU Langone Medical Center, discussing the factors which increase a woman's risk of developing a breast or ovarian cancer. It is important to seek out health professionals, genetic counselors or doctors who are qualified to identify these and advise how to lower ones risk.
- Julia A. Smith, MD, PhD, clinical assistant professor, Departments of Medicine and Medicine
More: escapecancer.com

 

"I Like Handbag" Blog

July 14
Advice Helps Prevent Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery
Those who get additional information about lymphedema reported fewer symptoms and practiced more risk-reducing behaviors, according to a recent study. "It is important to identify the early warning signs and symptoms of the condition, as well as determine what interventions to take," said new air max study co-author Deborah Axelrod, MD, an associate professor in the department of surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center and a member of the NYU Cancer Institute.
- Deborah Axelrod, MD, associate professor, Department of Surgery
More: ilikehandbag.com

 

WCBS Radio

July 12
Tanning Damages DNA and Can Lead to Melanoma Says New NYU Langone Medical Center Study - By Peter Haskell
Before you head out to the beach, you have to be smart about using sunscreen. "You have to practice ‘safe sun'", said Anna Pavlick, DO, associate professor, Departments of Medicine and Dermatology. "UV damage clearly does cause DNA damage to the melanasites which are the cells that cause melanoma." This means wear plenty of sunscreen that's at least SPF 15.
- Anna Pavlick, DO, associate professor, Departments of Medicine and Dermatology

 

Nursing Spectrum

July 12
RNs Pivotal to Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patient Care - By Marcia Frellick
Because inflammatory breast cancer often is misdiagnosed as an infection and spreads quickly, a nurse's observations may be critical in saving time and getting patients started immediately on the right treatment path. IBC is a rare and highly aggressive cancer largely misdiagnosed in women. Despite significant information on IBC, much is unknown. "There hasn't been progress in 20 years," says Robert Schneider, PhD, associate director for Translational Research, NYU Cancer Institute and co-director, Breast Cancer Research Program. "The initial clinical trials combining chemo and radiation have saved quite a few lives and have had a big impact, but we haven't extended survival past those original studies - not by much."
- Robert Schneider, PhD, Albert B. Sabin Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Pathogenesis, Departments of Microbiology and Radiation Oncology, associate director, Translational Research, NYU Cancer Institute, co-director, Breast Cancer Research Program
More: nurse.com

 

WSJ.com

July 9
Sunscreen Series Wrap-Up: What About Retinyl Palmitate? - By Katherine Hobson
Most recently, there's been a lot of chatter about retinyl palmitate, a derivative of vitamin A found in about 40% of sunscreens, and whether it might accelerate the growth of tumors. (Rodent studies have found such an association.) "As for comparing sunscreen use to the risk of moderate sun exposure - who knows what "moderate" means? Sun exposure is like a meter in a taxi cab - it's always moving forward," said Darrell S. Rigel, MD, clinical professor of dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center Sunscreen stops that. So does protective clothing and avoiding the midday sun. There's no such thing as a safe tan.
- Darrell S. Rigel, MD, clinical professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
More: wsj.com