NYUCI In The News, 2012

 

December 2012

 

Cancer.gov

Caffeinated Coffee Linked To Lower Risk of Some Oral Cancers – By David Simpson
A new multi-institute American Cancer Society study finds a strong inverse association between caffeinated coffee intake and oral/pharyngeal cancer mortality. Co-author Richard Hayes, DDS, PhD, MPH, is cited.
-Richard B. Hayes, DDS, PhD, MPH, professor, Departments of Population health and Environmental Medicine, Division of Epidemiology
Read more: cancer.gov

ModernMedicine.com

December 1
Supportive Oncodermatology Delivers Benefits for Patients, Dermatologists, Oncologists
Supportive oncodermatology, which focuses on the care of cutaneous conditions in cancer patients, is an emerging field in dermatology and a highly rewarding one because of its potential to positively impact an individual’s near-term and future well-being, says Beth McLellan, MD.
-Beth N. McLellan, MD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: modernmedicine.com

 

November 2012

 

NorthJersey.com

November 29
Toenail Clippings Will Be Used to Test for Chromium in Garfield Residents – By Kristie Cattafi
The City of Garfield entered into a partnership with the NYU School of Medicine’s department of environmental medicine that will provide a way for residents to know if they have been affected by chromium by testing toe nail clippings. A major concern for residents in the chromium contaminated Superfund site area has been the need for testing to see if their health has been affected by chromium. NYU’s department of environmental medicine has ways to measure chromium with toenail clippings, where it can determine a level of exposure in the body for the past 18 months. The agreement was approved at the Nov. 20 council meeting. Judith Zelikoff, PhD, is quoted.
-Judith T. Zelikoff, PhD, professor, Department of Environmental Medicine, Nelson Institute for Environmental Medicine
Read more: northjersey.com

MundoFOX

November 28
A Guide for Mammography to Prevent and Detect Breast Cancer – By Peggy Carranza
The mammogram screening guidelines set forth by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), may lead to more missed cancers and a decline in screening, new studies concluded. The new studies looked at the effectiveness of the guidelines that were presented on Nov. 27 at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting in Chicago. Cristina M. Checka, MD, is interviewed.
-Cristina M. Checka, MD, assistant professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Read more: mundofox.com

News-Medical.net

November 27
Post-Prostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Disliked – By Sally Robertson
Less than half of men who initiate intracorporeal injections (ICI) for post-prostatectomy erectile dysfunction (PPED) are still satisfied with the treatment years later, report researchers. Although the treatment is effective, the most common reasons for discontinuing the treatment in a study conducted by Herbert Lepor, MD, and team were discomfort and pain associated with the injections.
-Herbert Lepor, MD, professor and Martin Spatz Chair Department of Urology and professor, Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Read more: news-medical.net

 

October 2012

 

U.S. News & World Report

October 10
Blood Test May Spot Rare Lung Cancer - By Serena Gordon, HealthDay News
A blood test may identify the often difficult-to-diagnose cancer called mesothelioma, new research lead by Harvey Pass, MD, suggests.
-Harvey I. Pass, MD, Stephen E. Banner Professor of Thoracic Oncology, Departments of Surgery and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery
Read more: health.usnews.com

MedpageToday.com

Story also appeared on ScienceDaily.com, MedicalXPress.com
October 10
Biomarker for Asbestos-Linked Cancer Works - By Michael Smith
Glycoprotein fibulin-3 can be used to identify patients with pleural mesothelioma and may be a useful biomarker for the asbestos-related illness, researchers reported in the Oct. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Lead investigator Harvey I. Pass, MD, is quoted.
-Harvey I. Pass, MD, Stephen E. Banner Professor of Thoracic Oncology, Departments of Surgery and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery
Read more: medpagetoday.com

MedicalDaily.com

October 10
National Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Breast Cancer During Pregnancy – By Nikki Tucker
As more and more women opt to focus on their career goals prior to having children, there are a growing number of medical centers that are diagnosing an increasing amount of women with breast cancer who are pregnant. Yelena Novik, MD, is featured throughout article.
-Yelena Novik, MD, assistant professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology
Read more: medicaldaily.com

CNN.com

October 8
Marijuana as Medicine: Old Drugs, New Cancer Cures – By Dr. Sanjay Gupta
Julie Holland, MD, is interviewed about marijuana use for the medical treatment of cancer.
-Julie A. Holland, MD, clinical assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry
View segment and read more: cnn.com/videocnn.com

Oncology Times

October 10
Ovarian Cancer: Future of PARP Inhibitor Olaparib Still Uncertain in Platinum-Sensitive Serous Disease – By Robert H. Carlson
An interim analysis of the randomized, Phase II P-19 trial of maintenance treatment with the PARP inhibitor olaparib in patients with platinum-sensitive relapsed serous ovarian cancer shows the drug is still not improving overall survival compared with placebo. John Curtin, MD, comments on study.
-John Curtin, MD, professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology
Read more: journals.lww.com

OncLive.com

October 8
New Metastatic Melanoma Therapies Create Hope for Patients, Key Role for Oncology Nurses – By Lauren M. Green
Melanoma nurse practitioner Rajni Kannan is passionate about helping her patients at NYU’s Cancer Institute fight the disease of melanoma. National Comprehensive Cancer Center guidelines recommend clinical trials as first-line therapy for metastatic melanoma patients. According to Kannan, nurse navigators can make a huge difference by helping patients locate not only the right trials for their diseases, but also studies that will accept their health insurance plans.
-Rajni Kanna, Department of Nursing
-NYU Cancer Institute

Read more: onclive.com

NY1 Noticias

October 5
New Study Classifies Breast Cancer In 4 Different Types – By Fabiola Galindo
In a study published in the journal Nature, new research identifies four genetically distinct forms of breast cancer. Cristina Checka, MD, is interviewed about the study and treatment options for patients.
-Cristina M. Checka, MD, assistant professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Read more: ny1noticias.com

Phys.org

October 1
Researchers Identify Inflammatory Mediators in Pancreatic Cancer
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer that feeds off inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Current research is directed at determining how the tumor interacts with the surrounding tissue to drive inflammation and tumor growth. George Miller, MD, is quoted.
-George Miller, MD, assistant professor, Departments of Surgery and Cell Biology
Read more: phys.org

 

September 2012

 

Oncology Nurse Advisor

September 25
Lying Prone May Spare Heart, Lungs in Breast Radiation – By Delicia Honen Yard
Changing the position of a patient while receiving radiation therapy for breast cancer may reduce the later risks of heart and lung problems, according to a new study.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: oncologynurseadvisor.com

American Council on Science and Health

September 20
Position During Breast Irradiation Can Minimize Collateral Damage
Article about the risks breast cancer patients face during treatment highlights a recent study by Silvia Formenti, MD, showing the advantages of positioning breast cancer patients on their stomachs (prone) rather than on their backs (supine) during post-lumpectomy radiotherapy.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: acsh.org

Digital Journal

Also published by PRWeb.com, Scottrade.com, American Banking News
September 18
Rosetta Radiology Takes Steps to Improve Breast Cancer Awareness in New York City with New Radiation Oncology Treatment
The research letter published recently in JAMA by Silvia C. Formenti is cited as Rosetta Radiology unveiled their new radiation oncology technique designed to benefit patients with breast cancer. The study from NYU Langone found breast cancer patients who lay face down during radiotherapy receive less exposure of radiation to the lungs, allowing for more precise cancer treatment. Silvia Formenti, MD, is mentioned.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: digitaljournal.comprweb.comscottrade.com,  americanbankingnews.com

The Cancer Letter

September 14
Howard Fine Becomes Hematology Chief at NYU Langone Medical Center
Howard Fine has joined NYU Langone Medical Center as chief of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, director of the Brain Tumor Center, deputy director of the NYU Cancer Institute, and the Anne Murnick Cogan and David H. Cogan Professor of Oncology. Fine’s appointment became effective Sept. 5.

Fine comes to NYU Langone from the NCI Center for Cancer Research, where he served as the chief of the Neuro-Oncology Branch and held a joint appointment with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke as an adjunct investigator. In his new role, he has a wide range of responsibilities including directing clinical programs in solid tumor oncology, developmental therapeutics, malignant hematology and experimental hematology.

Before joining NCI in 2000, Fine was both director of the Neuro-Oncology Disease Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and of the Neuro- Oncology Program at the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.

ModernMedicine

September 14
Prone Position More Protective During Breast Radiation – By Contemporary OB/GYN Staff
Prone—rather than supine—positioning during breast radiation therapy for breast cancer reduces the amount of radiation that reaches the heart and lungs without sacrificing efficacy, according to a research letter published in JAMA. Research by NYU School of Medicine is cited.
-NYU School of Medicine
Read more: modernmedicine.com

Huffington Post

September 11
New Ovarian Cancer Screening Guidelines Highlight Lack of Options for Women – By Catherine Pearson
On Tuesday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released new recommendations about the effectiveness of specific clinical preventive services for patients without related signs or symptoms. There is however existing options that testing may do more harm than good. Stephanie Blank, MD, is quoted.
-Stephanie V. Blank, MD, associate professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Read more: huffingtonpost.com

U.S. News & World Report

Continued pick up of HealthDay syndicated story also appeared in Newsday, Philly.com, MedlinePlus, HealthFinder, Life Science Log
September 6
Face-Down Position May Be Safer During Radiation for Breast Cancer: Study - By Kathleen Doheny
Changing the position of a patient while receiving radiation therapy for breast cancer may reduce the later risks of heart and lung problems, according to a new study.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: health.usnews.comnewsday.comphilly.comnlm.nih.govlifesciencelog.com

HealthDay

September 5
Face-Down Position May Be Safer During Radiation for Breast Cancer: Study - By Kathleen Doheny
A new study was published as a research letter in the Sept. 5 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) by Silvia C. Formenti, MD on the significance of prone vs supine positioning for breast cancer radiotherapy. Simulation scans are used to help doctors visualize structures such as the heart and lungs and help them make a plan about the best treatment position to target the cancer effectively while sparing normal tissue as much as possible.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: health.usnews.com

Medical Daily

September 6
For Breast Cancer Treatment, Lying on Your Stomach Is the Best Option – BY Nikki Tucker
Whole breast radiotherapy has been linked to damage in the heart and lungs, along with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Researchers from the Cancer Institute at NYU Langone Medical Center theorize damage to the heart and lungs can be reduced by lying on your stomach rather than on your back.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: medicaldaily.com

Medline Plus

Continued pick up of HealthDay syndicated story also appeared in BlueCross BlueShield Association
September 6
Face-Down Position May Be Safer During Radiation for Breast Cancer: Study – By Kathleen Doheny
Changing the position of a patient while receiving radiation therapy for breast cancer may reduce the later risks of heart and lung problems, according to a new study.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: nlm.nih.govbcbs.com

 

August 2012

 

DOTMed News

August 10
Post: NYC's First Proton Center Headed for Harlem – By Brandon Nafziger
New York City's first proton therapy center might be coming to Harlem. The consortium of local hospitals and a Florida radiation oncology group are looking into a new location for the proposed cancer-fighting venture. The proton consortium includes 21st Century Oncology, based in Florida, and local hospitals in New York including NYU Langone Medical Center.
-NYU Langone Medical Center
Read more: dotmed.com

Nurse.com

August 7
U.S. Health Official Adds 50 Types of Cancer to Illnesses Covered By 9/11 Fund - By Geneva Slupski
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, cancers such as thyroid, bladder, lung, kidney, breast and ovarian are among those being recommended for compensation by the CDC’s World Trade Center Health Program Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee. Gary Shelton, RN, MSN, NP, is quoted.
-Gary Shelton, RN, MSN, NP, clinical research program coordinator, NYU Cancer Institute
Read more: nurse.com

KTSP.com (ABC News Website Affiliate)

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on MyFox47.com, WTRF.com (CBS News Website Affiliate), 14News.com (NBC News Website Affiliate), NJHerald.com, StateJournal.com
August 3
Could Compact Fluorescent Bulbs Pose Skin Cancer Risk? – By Alan Mozes, HealthDay News
As the United States endures the summer sun, dermatologists often warn of cancer risks posed by ultraviolet (UV) sunlight. Research now points to a new and ubiquitous indoor source of these harmful rays: eco-friendly compact fluorescent light bulbs. Darrell S. Rigel, MD, is quoted.
-Darrell S. Rigel, MD, clinical professor, The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: kstp.commyfox47.comnjherald.com

Prostate.net

August 5
Scientists Discover Gene that Controls Aging, Inflammation and Cancer
Researchers at NYU of Medicine have discovered a single gene that controls aging, inflammation and cancer. The principal investigator Robert J. Schneider, PhD, is quoted.
-Robert J. Schneider, PhD, the Albert B. Sabin Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Pathogenesis, Department of Microbiology and professor, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: prostate.net

 

July 2012

 

EurekAlert

July 26
Also published by Newswise
Study Pinpoints a Genetic Cause of Most Lethal Brain Tumor May Lead to New Treatment
Researchers have discovered some cases of glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of primary brain cancer, are caused by the fusion of two adjacent genes. The findings were published in the online edition of the journal Science. John G. Golfinos, MD, and David Zagzag, MD, are included as study authors.
-John Golfinos, MD, associate professor and chair, Department of Neurosurgery and associate professor, Department of Otolaryngology
-David Zagzag, MD, professor, Departments of Neurosurgery and Pathology

Read more: eurekalert.orgnewswise.com

Scientific American

July 25
Also published by FierceBiotech.com, PharmiWeb.com, HeraldOnline (PA), AlphaTrade.com
Massive Genomics Center Set to Open in Lower Manhattan – By Robin Lloyd
Construction is underway in lower Manhattan to build a large genomics center to house seven stories of labs and offices to support genomic sequencing and analysis, bioinformatics, data mining and translational medicine. A total of 11 mostly New York-area academic institutions, and some pharmaceutical and tech firms, will collaborate on the center. NYU School of Medicine is one of the research institutions involved.
-New York University/NYU School of Medicine
Read more: scientificamerican.comfiercebiotech.compharmiweb.comheraldonline.com

Science Daily

July 24
Also published by eScienceNews.com, HealthCanal.com, EurekAlert.org
A New Route for Tackling Treatment-Resistant Prostate Cancer
In a study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation scientists found the protein paxillin is a major player in prostate cancer, the second most common form of cancer in men. Though in the very early stages, the discovery is an important first step towards developing a treatment for men whose cancer prevails even after the most aggressive treatment. Jonathan Melamed, MD, is mentioned as one of the researchers involved in the study.
-Jonathan Melamed, MD, associate professor, Department of Pathology
Read more: sciencedaily.comhealthcanal.comesciencenews.com

Oncology Times

July 25
Pancreatic Cancer Conference Shows a Field in Transition – By Rabiya S. Tuma, PhD
Attendees from 20 countries participated in what was expected to be a relatively small gathering of pancreatic cancer specialists in South Lake Tahoe Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, is quoted.
-Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, senior vice president and vice dean for science, chief scientific officer, professor and chair, Department of Biochemistry
Read more: lww.com

Fox 5 News

July 19
Baby with Brain Cancer – By Dan Bowens
Eric James Baron was 10 months old when he was diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer. Thanks to his doctors and advanced treatments, the NYU Langone team removed 98 percent of the tumor, and he is days away from celebrating his first birthday. Jeffrey Wisoff, MD, is interviewed.
-Jeffrey H. Wisoff, MD, associate professor, Department of Neurosurgery and the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders
View segment: myfoxny.com

WCBS Eye on New York

July 15
Battling Breast Cancer
Segment discusses new legislation that will provide women greater information about their mammogram screenings. Freya Schnabel, MD, comments on need for detailed communications between physician and patient.
-Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Video Segment no longer available online.

Crain's Health Pulse

July 13
At A Glance: IMAGING CENTER – By Gale Scott
NYU Langone Medical Center opened a Center for Women's Imaging at 221 Lexington Ave last month. It offers extended evening and weekend hours and same-day appointments, and patients can get test results while they wait. Tests include mammography, breast ultrasound, and bone density analysis.
-NYU Langone Medical Center
Link is unavailable, subscription is required.

The Doctors

July 12, 13
The da Vinci Si Surgical Robot at NYU Langone Medical Center – Dr. Drew Odon
Michael D. Stifelman, MD, explains how the da Vinci Si Surgical Robot is used at NYU Langone.
-Michael D. Stifelman, MD, associate professor, Department of Urology
View segment: thedoctorstv.com

NewsRX.com

July 12
Accelerated Radiation Treatment Effective for Noninvasive Breast Cancer
Accelerated whole breast irradiation after lumpectomy is an effective treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a very common early stage and noninvasive form of breast cancer, meaning many more breast cancer patients could see their treatment times reduced by half, according to a study by Silvia Formenti, MD, and colleagues. Senior author Dr. Formenti is quoted.
-Silvia C. Formenti, MD, the Sandra and Edward H. Meyer Professor of Radiation Oncology and chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Read more: newsrx.com

Journal of the National Cancer Institute

July 9
Study Supports PSA Velocity Risk Count – By Mike Fillon
Amid ongoing controversy on the value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, a slightly different measure—PSA velocity (PSAV) “risk count,” the number of times a patient exceeds a PSAV threshold—may offer a more effective way for physicians to screen men for clinically meaningful prostate cancer than PSA alone. Stacy Loeb, MD, is quoted.
-Stacy Loeb, MD, clinical instructor, Department of Urology
Read more: oxfordjournals.org

 

June 2012

 

Oncology Nurse Advisor

June 28
Scientists Expose Deadly Trick Behind Pancreatic Cancer – By Delicia Honen Yard
In the early stages of pancreatic cancer, tumor cells establish an immunosuppressive environment that allows them to grow and divide freely, a discovery that could lead to more effective treatments for this aggressive disease. Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, is quoted.
-Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, senior vice president and vice dean for science, chief scientific officer, professor and chair, Department of Biochemistry
Read more: oncologynurseadvisor.com

Good Day New York

June 25
Cancer Rates Continue to Drop – By Roshini Raj, MD
A new study shows cancer fatality rates are better now than in 1970.. Roshini Rajapaksa, MD comments.
-Roshini Rajapaksa, MD, assistant professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology
Video no longer available

ABCNews.com

Story also picked up by RocketNews
June 23
Sunscreen: No More SPF Excuses – By Karina Giglio, Women’s Health Magazine
About 90 percent of the 2 million new cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer diagnosed in the U.S. each year are caused by the sun, yet 34 percent of women still never use sunscreen. Robert Friedman, MD, is quoted.
-Robert J. Friedman, MD, clinical professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: abcnews.go.comrocketnews.com

San Diego Jewish World

June 21
Playwright, 83, Thanks Mother And Doctor For Life-Saving Surgery – By Donald H. Harrison
Although a precedent-setting prostate surgery occurred in New York City, the setting for much of the story is San Diego, where the doctor grew up and the mother of the patient resides. Herbert, Lepor, MD, is interviewed.
-Herbert Lepor, MD, professor and Martin Spatz Chairman, Department of Urology and professor, Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology.
Read more: sdjewishworld.com

Examiner.com

June 21
Staying Sun Safe this Summer – By Gabriele Monson
As people are flocking to the beach, that summer resort, those outdoor ballgames, the mountains, outdoor graduations or catching up on yard work, the dangers of too much sun lurk everywhere. A little known fact is the danger of sun exposure while sitting next to a window either in your home or in your car. Sumayah Jamal, MD, PhD, comments on UV rays and how glass only blocks UVB rays.
-Sumayah Jamal, MD, PhD, clinical assistant professor, research assistant professor, Department of Microbiology, and Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: examiner.com

The Wall Street Journal

June 17
New Home for the Genome Center – By Laura Kusisto
The New York Genome Center (NYGC) is in the final stages of negotiating a deal for about 150,000 square feet at 101 Sixth Ave., in what would be a big step in the city's effort to develop its biotech industry. The NYUGC was founded in August 2010 by many of the city's biggest hospitals and research centers, including NYU School of Medicine.
-NYU School of Medicine
Read more: online.wsj.com

Cancer.gov

June 12
NYU Study Provides Insight into Pancreatic Cancer Progression, New Target for Treatment
A new study done by Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, and colleagues reveals a strategy used by pancreatic cancer cells to manipulate the immune system in a way that enables them to escape destruction by specialized immune cells.
-NYU School of Medicine
Read more: cancer.gov

Cancer.gov

June 12
NYU Study Provides Insight into Pancreatic Cancer Progression, New Target for Treatment
A new study done by Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, and colleagues reveals a strategy used by pancreatic cancer cells to manipulate the immune system in a way that enables them to escape destruction by specialized immune cells.
-NYU School of Medicine
Read more: cancer.gov

MachinesLikeUs.com

Story also appeared on ScienceCodex.com June 12
New Insight into Pancreatic Cancer Progression
A new study done by Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, and colleagues reveals a strategy used by pancreatic cancer cells to manipulate the immune system in a way that enables them to escape destruction by specialized immune cells.
-Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, senior vice president and vice dean for Science, chief scientific officer and professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Read more: machineslikeus.comsciencecodex.com

NY Times

June 8
Sept. 11 Health Fund Given Clearance to Cover Cancer – By Anemona Hartocollis
A federal health official’s decision came as a vindication for people who have claimed that their cancers were caused by exposure to the dust cloud and debris at ground zero.
Learn more: nytimes.com

WomensHealth.gov

MedicineNet.com, EverydayHealth.com, WomensHealth.gov, iVillage.com
June 6
Financial Worries Add to Cancer Patients’ Burden – By E.J. Mundell, HealthDay
A small study provides a snapshot into the financial anxieties that plague many patients with advanced cancer and their spouses, even as they struggle against the disease itself. Four of every five such American patients and their spouses-caregivers in the study said they had concerns about meeting medical costs. Worries about paying medical costs also were tied to lower mental and physical health, the study found. Sylvia Adams, MD, is quoted.
-Sylvia Adams, MD, assistant professor, Department of Medicine
Read more: womenshealth.govmedicinenet.comeverydayhealth.comivillage.com

WTMA.com

Story also appeared on AkronNewsNow.com, 670KBOI.com, KMBZ.com, KSFO560.com, WJIMam.com, WGOWam.com, 100WAPI.com, WBSM.com, KGOam810.com
June 6
New Cancer Drug Gives Patients with Rare Skin Cancer New Hope
A study by Darrell Rigel, MD, suggests that vismodegib is a beneficial treatment for patients with Gorlin syndrome. Darrell Rigel, MD, is quoted.
-Darrell S. Rigel, MD, clinical professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: wtma.comakronnewsnow.com

Healthfinder.gov

June 4
New 'Personalized' Drugs Show Promise Against Melanoma, Lung Cancer - By E.J. Mundell, HealthDay News
Two studies to be presented Monday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting focus on drugs that treated advanced melanoma, while a third study looks at a gene-targeted chemotherapy for a subset of lung cancers. All of the drugs seemed effective in these phase 3 trials. Sylvia Adams, MD, is quoted.
-Sylvia Adams, MD, assistant professor, Department of Medicine
Read more: healthfinder.gov

 

May 2012

 

ScienceDaily.com

Also Regator.com, TheCuttingEdgenews.com, MedicalExpress.com, Kenya Star, ScienceDaily.com, MedicalNews.net, ZeeNews.com
May 24
Gene Behind Chronic Inflammation, Aging And Cancer Identified
Dr. Schneider and colleagues have identified a single gene that simultaneously controls inflammation, accelerated aging and cancer. This current study reveals that AUF1, a family of four related genes, not only controls the inflammatory response, but also maintains the integrity of chromosomes by activating the enzyme telomerase to repair the ends of chromosomes, thereby simultaneously reducing inflammation, preventing rapid aging and the development of cancer.
-Robert J. Schneider, PhD, the Albert Sabin Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Pathogenesis, Departments of Microbiology and Radiation Oncology
Read More: sciencedaily.com

Targeted News.com

May 24
Also Surgistrategies.com and AZRobtics.com
Surgeons at NYU Langone Demonstrate Robotic Surgery Skills via Satellite – By Kalwinder Kaur
NYU Langone Medical Center’s team of urological surgeons conducted robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy in New York. Using high definition satellite, this New York–based surgical procedure was shared visually with over 400 participants of American Urological Association’s (AUA) 2012 Annual Meeting, earlier this week in Atlanta. Michael Stifelman, MD, is cited.
-Michael Stifelman, MD, associate professor, Department of Urology
Read More: surgistrategies.comazorobotics.comtargetednews.com

WIFR-TV (CBS Rockford, IL)

New Prostate Cancer Screening Recommendations
A federal task force is recommending against blood tests that measure PSA for all men, for prostate cancer screening. Herbert Lepor, MD is quoted.
-Herbert Lepor, MD, Martin Spatz Chair and professor, Department of Urology and professor, Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Read more: wifr.com

CBS Evening News

Coverage also appeared on WKRC.com, WYMT.com, WBEN.com
May 23
Routine PSA for Prostate Cancer Not Healthy?
A panel of health experts called the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says men should no longer get routine prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests to screen for prostate cancer. The tests may lead to treatments that do more harm than good. Herbert Lepor, MD is interviewed.
-Herbert Lepor, MD, Martin Spatz Chair and professor, Department of Urology and professor, Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Video segment no longer available

CNN.com

Article also appeared on ABCActionNews.com, ClickonDetroit.com
May 16
Avoid Sunscreens with Potentially Harmful Ingredients, Group Warns - By Danielle Dellorto Twenty-five percent of 800 tested sunscreens are effective at protecting your skin without the use of potentially harmful ingredients, according to the 2012 Sunscreen Guide released Wednesday by the Environmental Working Group. Ariel Ostad, MD, is quoted.
-Ariel Ostad, MD, clinical assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: cnn.comabcactionnews.comclickondetroit.com

U.S. News & World Report

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on Yahoo! News, health.msn.com
May 9
Scientists Map Melanoma's Genome - By Barbara Bronson Gray
Researchers have completed the first genome sequencing of melanoma, an aggressive and frequently fatal form of skin cancer. Darrell Rigel, MD, is quoted.
-Darrell S. Rigel, MD, clinical professor, The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: usnews.comhealthday.comyahoo.commsn.com

 

April 2012

 

U.S. News & World Report

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on WOIO.com, NewsDay.com, MyFox.com, health.msn.com
April 19
Healthy Lifestyle Choices Could Cut Cancer Rates: Report – By Robert Preidt, HealthDay News
Most people know what lifestyle choices will keep the chances of a cancer diagnosis low: Don't smoke, eat healthy, exercise and get the recommended screenings. But, many Americans don't make those choices, and a new report suggests that lawmakers and private industry need to do more to help make those changes easier ones to make. Freya Schnabel, MD, is quoted.
-Freya R. Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Read more: health.usnews.com

Crain’s Health Pulse

Stories also appeared on HANYS Member E-Clips News Alert

April 16
WHO'S NEWS - By Barbara Benson
Lawrence Leichman, MD, and Cynthia Gail Leichman, MD, are new faculty members at the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology at NYU Langone Medical Center, specializing in GI cancers. Today’s edition of Crain’s Health Pulse also mentions NYU Langone Medical Center in the article, “Foundations Give Hospitals Financial Boost.”
-Lawrence P. Leichman, MD, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Division of Clinical Neurophysiology
-Cynthia Gail Leichman, MD, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Division of Clinical Neurophysiology

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Hive Health Media

April 13
5 Health Tips for Fighting Mesothelioma - By Cesar Zambrano
Mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer that is caused by heavy exposure to asbestos. Although the disease tends to spread quickly and respond less-than-favorably to treatment, there are several ways mesothelioma patients can extend their prognosis. Article lists Harvey Pass, MD, as a leading mesothelioma expert in the nation.
-Harvey I. Pass, MD, the Stephen E. Banner Professor of Thoracic Oncology, professor Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Surgery
Read more: hivehealthmedia.com

DailyRX.com

April 12
Women, Cancer and Fertility – By Laurie Stoneham
Young women undergoing cancer treatment are often more concerned with saving their lives than saving their ability to have children. But there are options for preserving fertility; they just need to be discussed. Stephanie V. Blank, MD, is quoted.
-Stephanie V. Blank, MD, assistant professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Read more: dailyrx.com

Huffington Post

April 5
Depo-Provera, Injectable Birth Control, Linked With Doubled Breast Cancer Risk - By Amanda L. Chan
An injectable kind of birth control has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer in young women, according to a new study in the journal Cancer Research. Freya Schnabel, MD, is quoted from HealthDay interview, noting that women should take the study findings with a grain of salt.
-Freya R. Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Read more: huffingtonpost.com

YourHealth.com

April 4
Top 10 Natural Cancer Killers
A recent study found that the adoption of only one of five healthy lifestyle habits, such as not smoking and drinking moderately, can lower the cancer risk in males by 14 per cent. Included in the article is a list of the top 10 cancer fighting foods, as compiled by Geo Espinosa, N.D., L.Ac, CNS, the Director of the Integrative Urology Center at NYU Langone Medical Center.
-Geo Espinosa, N.D., L.Ac, CNS, director, Integrative Urology Center, NYU Langone Medical Center
Read more: yourhealth.com.sg

HerWorldPlus.com

Syndicated AFP story also appeared on MySinchew.com, southasianmedia.net
April 4
Skin Cancer On the Rise Among Young Adults: U.S. study - By Agence France-Presse (AFP)
Skin cancer is on the rise among young adults, according to a study published Monday that suggests indoor tanning beds and childhood sunburns may be to blame. Jennifer Stein, MD, PhD, is quoted.
-Jennifer A. Stein, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: herworldplus.commysinchew.com

WBAY.com (ABC affiliate)

April 3
Melanoma Rates on the Rise Among Young Adults - By Denise Mann, HealthDay News
New research highlights a dramatic increase in the rates of melanoma, a potentially fatal form of skin cancer, among young adults, with young women being hit the hardest. Jennifer Stein, MD, PhD, is quoted.
-Jennifer A. Stein, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read morewbay.com

NYDailyNews.com

April 3
Skin Cancer On the Rise Among Young Adults: U.S. study - By Agence France-Presse (AFP)
Skin cancer is on the rise among young adults, according to a study published Monday that suggests indoor tanning beds and childhood sunburns may be to blame. Jennifer Stein, MD, PhD, is quoted.
-Jennifer A. Stein, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: nydailynews.com

U.S. News & World Report

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on Yahoo! News, Philly.com, EverydayHealth.com, iVillage.com, HealthFinder.gov, OregonHerald.com
April 1
Melanoma Rates On the Rise Among Young Adults: Study – By Denise Mann, HealthDay News
New research highlights a dramatic increase in the rates of melanoma, a potentially fatal form of skin cancer, among young adults, with young women being hit the hardest. Jennifer Stein, MD, PhD, is quoted.
-Jennifer A. Stein, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: health.usnews.com

 

March 2012

 

NYTIMES.com

March 20
Viruses Recruited as Killers of Tumors
-Ian Mohr, PhD
Read more: nytimes.com

ScienceMag.org

March 19
Enzyme 'Melts' Cancer Drug Barrier - By Jocelyn Kaiser
Researchers may have found a new way to treat pancreatic tumors, one of the deadliest and most drug-resistant forms of cancer. Injecting mice with a molecule that melts the tough structure around the tumor allowed a standard chemotherapy drug to better penetrate and destroy cancer cells. Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, is quoted.
-Dafna Bar-Sagi, PhD, senior vice president and vice dean for science, chief scientific officer, professor and chair, Department of Biochemistry
Read more: sciencemag.org

NY1 News

Story also appeared on NY1.com
March 14
Same Day Mammography Results Available at NYU Langone Medical Center -By Kafi Drexel
Jiyon Lee, MD, and her patient are featured and are interviewed about NYU Langone Medical Center’s same day mammography results at the Breast Imaging Center.
-Jiyon Lee, MD, assistant professor, Department of Radiology
Read more: ny1.com

Washington Post

March 13
Jeremy Hill, N.Y. Banker Who Contributed to Cancer Group, Dies at 43 - By Laurence Arnold
Jeremy Hill, a managing director at JPMorgan Chase & Co. who gave his time and money to support young people with cancer before being diagnosed with an advanced case of it himself, has died. He was 43. Hill was a member of NYU Cancer Institute’s advisory board since 2010. Lori Fink, chair of the board of advisers, is quoted.
-Lori Fink, chair, NYU Cancer Institute Advisory Board, trustee
Read more: washingtonpost.com

ABClocal.go.com

March 09, 2012
NYU offering 'instant' mammogram results
Read more: abclocal.go.com

WMCTV.com (NBC News Website Affiliate)

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on WFLX.com (Fox News Website Affiliate), 12NewsNow.com, WOIO.com (CBS News Website Affiliate), KLKNTV.com (ABC News Website Affiliate), CWRichmondTV.com, WomensHealth.gov, HometownStations.com, EverydayHealth.com
March 7
Estrogen-Only Therapy May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk - By Denise Mann, HealthDay News
Some women who take estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy to stave off hot flashes, night sweats and other symptoms of menopause may be at lower risk for developing breast cancer down the road, a news study says. Lila Nachtigall, MD, is quoted.
-Lila Nachtigall, MD, professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Read more: wmctv.com

 

February 2012

 

NY1 News

February 27
New HPV Vaccination Recommendations
Patricia Poitevien, MD, is interviewed about new recommendations for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to be administered to boys and girls ages 11 and 12. The vaccines are most effective before adolescents become sexually active, and children respond best to the vaccine before age 15. Vaccinations can prevent certain cancers caused by HPV
-Patricia Poitevien, MD, clinical assistant professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Orthopaedic Surgery
Video segment now offline

ABC News

Article also appeared on ABC News Radio
February 22
Proof at Last? Colonoscopy and Cancer Prevention
Data from large, conclusive studies that prove colonoscopies, currently the primary weapon in a doctor’s arsenal to catch colon cancer early, actually saves lives has so far been lacking. New research suggests that removing non-cancerous growths known as polyps could have a big impact on death from colorectal cancer, slashing the risk of death from colorectal cancer by more than 50 percent over the next decade and a half compared to the general population. Fritz Francois, MD, is quoted.
-Fritz Francois, MD, assistant professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology
Read more: abcnews.go.comwjimam.com

ModernMedicine.com

February 23
Study Shows Benefits of PSA Velocity Risk Count Testing for PCa
Tracking PSA levels over time offers a more accurate assessment of the risk of life-threatening prostate cancer. A novel PSA velocity risk count testing associated with fluctuations in PSA levels may provide a more effective way to screen for clinically significant prostate cancer, a recent multicenter study concludes. Lead author Stacy Loeb, MD, is quoted.
-Stacy Loeb, MD, clinical instructor, Department of Urology
Read more: modernmedicine.com

Scientific American

Article also appeared on Yahoo! News, esciencenews.com
February 8
Fasting Might Boost Chemo's Cancer-Busting Properties – By Katherine Harmon
Many of the tools we have for cancer treatment—chemotherapy, radiation—are big, blunt weapons that deal punishing blows to healthy tissues along with cancerous ones. So the hunt has been on for more finely targeted therapies that will attack malignant cells yet minimize damage to patients' bodies. A new study shows we might be able to catch cancer cells off guard by using an ancient and body-wide tactic: fasting. Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, PhD, is quoted.
-Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, PhD, professor, Departments of Radiation Oncology and Cell Biology
Read more: scientificamerican.comnews.yahoo.comesciencenews.com

ABCNews.com

Article also appeared on AkronNewsNow.com, News Radio (AL, MA, TN, MO, ID, MI, CA)
February 7
Older Women at Highest Risk for Breast Cancer Death
Older women with breast cancer may be at greater risk than younger women of dying from the disease, regardless of the type of tumor they have or treatment they undergo, according to a study released Tuesday. Deborah Axelrod, MD, is quoted.
-Deborah Axelrod, MD, associate professor, Department of Surgery
Read more: abcnews.go.com

 

January 2012

 

U.S. News & World Report

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on Yahoo! News, iVillage.com, Topix.com, HealthFinder.gov, Health.MSN.com, DoctorsLounge.com
January 31
Study Compares 3 Common Prostate Cancer Treatments – By Mary Elizabeth Dallas, HealthDay News
Experts comparing three leading prostate cancer therapies find external beam radiation therapy to be more toxic and expensive than either surgery or a more localized form of radiation therapy known as brachytherapy. Herbert Lepor, MD, is quoted.
-Herbert Lepor, MD, professor and Martin Spatz Chairman, Department of Urology
Read more: health.usnews.comhealthday.com

CBSLocal.com

January 31
Study: 1 In 4 Need Additional Surgery After Partial Mastectomy
A study of breast cancer patients finds there’s a significant complication for many of the patients who choose a partial mastectomy. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, show nearly one in four women need additional surgery, and that can be very stressful. Freya Schnabel, MD, is quoted.
-Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Read more: denver.cbslocal.com

CBS Newspath

January 31
Significant Number of Women Need Second Surgery After Partial Mastectomy - By Edward Lawrence
A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association says nearly one in four women need additional surgery after a partial mastectomy. Freya Schnabel, MD, is quoted.
-Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Video segment no longer available

DoctorsLounge.com

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on MDNews.com
January 23
No Mitotic Difference in Single or Multiple Primary Melanomas – By HealthDay News
For patients with single primary melanoma (SPM) and multiple primary melanomas (MPM), there is no significant difference in the presence or absence of mitosis, according to a study by researchers at NYU School of Medicine and published online Jan. 13 in Cancer.
-Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, NYU School of Medicine
Read more: doctorslounge.commdnews.com

WCBS 2 News

January 23
Breast Cancer Gene Family Link – By Dr. Max Gomez
Women who have the breast cancer gene are 50 to 80 percent more likely to develop the disease. There's also a good chance they could pass the gene onto their children. A new study looked at more than 253 parents who had genetic breast cancer testing and found that 66 percent shared their results with their kids. Freya Schnabel, MD, is interviewed.
-Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Video segment no longer available

NYDailyNews.com

January 21
Patients Suffering From Cancer and Other Ailments Struggle with a Shortage of Medicine - By Tracy Connor
Article about cancer drug shortages across the country and its affect on patients quotes James Speyer, MD. Article also mentions the affect of drug shortages on clinical trials at NYU Langone Medical Center.
-James L. Speyer, MD, professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, NYU Cancer Institute
Read more: nydailynews.com

CBS Newspath

January 20
Study Asks Parents Whether to Share Breast Cancer Risk with Kids
Women who have the breast cancer gene are 50 to 80 percent more likely to develop the disease. There's also a good chance they could pass the gene onto their children. A new study looked at more than 253 parents who had genetic breast cancer testing and found that 66 percent shared their results with their kids. Freya Schnabel, MD, is interviewed.
-Freya Schnabel, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Breast Surgery
Video segment no longer available

USAToday.com

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on MedicineNet.com, WLTX.com (Columbia, SC), Zimbio.com
January 18
Melanoma Drug's Link to Other Skin Cancers Identified - By Madonna Behen, HealthDay News
The recently approved drug vemurafenib (Zelboraf) has been hailed as a breakthrough in the treatment of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. But roughly one-quarter of patients who take the medication develop a troublesome side effect: secondary skin cancers called squamous cell carcinomas. Iman Osman, MD, is quoted.
-Iman Osman, MD, associate professor, Departments of Medicine, Urology, and the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: usatoday.com

U.S. News & World Report

Syndicated HealthDay article also appeared on Health.MSN.com, iVillage.com, HealthFinder.gov, Yahoo! News, Drugs.com
January 18
Melanoma Drug's Link to Other Skin Cancers Identified - By Madonna Behen, HealthDay News
The recently approved drug vemurafenib (Zelboraf) has been hailed as a breakthrough in the treatment of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. But roughly one-quarter of patients who take the medication develop a troublesome side effect: secondary skin cancers called squamous cell carcinomas. Now, a new study identifies the specific genetic mechanism that causes this side effect. Iman Osman, MD, is quoted.
-Iman Osman, MD, associate professor, Departments of Medicine, Urology, and the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology
Read more: health.usnews.comhealthday.comhealth.msn.comivillage.com

Healthymagination.com (General Electric Online Healthblog)

January 17
Brain Tumor Breakthrough: “Head Start” Protocol at NYU Langone Medical Center - By Nelly Gupta
Article explains the story of a young boy who was diagnosed with medulloblastoma, a rapidly growing, malignant tumor located in the cerebellum, at age 7. Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders and Sharon Gardner, MD, are featured.
-Sharon Gardner, MD, associate professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Medical Oncology
Read more: healthymagination.com

Medical News Today

Article also picked up by MedCompare.com, MedIndia, eCancerNews, Medical Express
January 13
Indexing Ovarian Cancer Symptoms: How Valuable Are They - By Grace Rattue
A study published January 13 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reveals that in the UK and the U.S., symptom indices used to identify individuals with symptoms connected with ovarian cancer who may need additional screening is on the rise, however, in order to help better detect cancer they may need to be reevaluated. An associated report is quoted, citing co-author James L. Speyer, MD.
-James L. Speyer, MD, professor, NYU Cancer Institute
Read more: medicalnewstoday.com

NCI Cancer Center News

HealthJockey.com
January 13
Study Shows How Notch Gene and PRC2 Protein Complex Work Together to Cause T-ALL
A new study published in the journal Nature Medicine by NYU Cancer Institute researchers, shows how the cancer causing gene Notch, in combination with a mutated Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) protein complex, work together to cause T- cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Iannis Aifantis, PhD, and Panagiotis Ntziachristos, PhD, are quoted.
-Iannis Aifantis, PhD, associate professor, Department of Pathology
-Panagiotis Ntziachristos, PhD, Department of Pathology

Read more: cancer.govhealthjockey.com

News-Medical.net

Also appeared on Bio-Medicine.org, eScienceNews.com, ScienceDaily.com, AllVoices.com
January 13
Study Shows How Notch Gene and PRC2 Protein Complex Work Together to Cause T-ALL
A new study published in the journal Nature Medicine by NYU Cancer Institute researchers, shows how the cancer causing gene Notch, in combination with a mutated Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) protein complex, work together to cause T- cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Iannis Aifantis, PhD, and Panagiotis Ntziachristos, PhD, are quoted.
-Iannis Aifantis, PhD, associate professor, Department of Pathology
-Panagiotis Ntziachristos, PhD, Department of Pathology

Read more: news-medical.netbio-medicine.org

ScienceCodex.com

Also appeared on MedicalXPress.com, BioPortfolio.com
January 12
New Culprit Discovered In T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
A new study published in the journal Nature Medicine by NYU Cancer Institute researchers, shows how the cancer causing gene Notch, in combination with a mutated Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) protein complex, work together to cause T- cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Iannis Aifantis, PhD, and Panagiotis Ntziachristos, PhD, are quoted.
-Iannis Aifantis, PhD, associate professor, Department of Pathology
-Panagiotis Ntziachristos, PhD, Department of Pathology

Read more: sciencecodex.commedicalxpress.combioportfolio.com